No One Is Paying Attention to Dubai’s Mega-Rich Rappers
The United Arab Emirates isn’t a country you’d typically associate with hip-hop. It’s a place that is generally bereft of the cultural signifiers native to the dark, dank locales where rap was birthed—Illmatic, for instance, probably wouldn’t have been the same album if it was about the struggle of going $40 million over budget on your new artificial archipelago instead of the fight out of inner-city poverty.
But the young Emirati elite throwing cash at studio time and music videos to force their way into the rap game don’t care about that, and why should they? Genres don’t have to stay rooted. Dubstep was spawned in a south London borough known for its train stations and knife crime, and has become the party music of choice for frat boys with facial piercings the world over.    
The problem is that those wads of cash aren’t conducive to your scene being taken particularly seriously. There aren’t many rappers in the UAE unleashing conscious backpack records aboutthe government’s oppression of its critics; far more who are content to jack Flo Rida’s artistic process and find new words to rhyme “club” with over a lame club-rap beat.
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No One Is Paying Attention to Dubai’s Mega-Rich Rappers

The United Arab Emirates isn’t a country you’d typically associate with hip-hop. It’s a place that is generally bereft of the cultural signifiers native to the dark, dank locales where rap was birthed—Illmatic, for instance, probably wouldn’t have been the same album if it was about the struggle of going $40 million over budget on your new artificial archipelago instead of the fight out of inner-city poverty.

But the young Emirati elite throwing cash at studio time and music videos to force their way into the rap game don’t care about that, and why should they? Genres don’t have to stay rooted. Dubstep was spawned in a south London borough known for its train stations and knife crime, and has become the party music of choice for frat boys with facial piercings the world over.    

The problem is that those wads of cash aren’t conducive to your scene being taken particularly seriously. There aren’t many rappers in the UAE unleashing conscious backpack records aboutthe government’s oppression of its critics; far more who are content to jack Flo Rida’s artistic process and find new words to rhyme “club” with over a lame club-rap beat.

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Notes:

  1. theblacksouthernbelle reblogged this from vicemag
  2. soafrolicious reblogged this from myafricais
  3. myafricais reblogged this from vicemag and added:
    My Africa Is rapping.
  4. marlenneea reblogged this from vicemag
  5. savanhycee reblogged this from vicemag
  6. sexyhombre reblogged this from vicemag
  7. raw-r-evolution reblogged this from vicemag and added:
    Hip hop has enough douchbags throwing money around.
  8. dookie-j reblogged this from vicemag
  9. wherefromhowwhywhatwhen reblogged this from vicemag
  10. ipullout88 reblogged this from vicemag
  11. prince-akeem reblogged this from vicemag
  12. kamikagurl reblogged this from vicemag
  13. misty-diamonds reblogged this from vicemag
  14. audiodailydouble reblogged this from vicemag and added:
    But anybody claiming stacks gotta Long way to compare to these boys