Mennonites in Alberta, Canada Have Cozy Relations with a Notorious Mexican Drug Cartel
From a distance Grassy Lake, Alberta doesn’t have a whole lot going on. The rural hamlet takes up less than one square mile of a prairie highway between Lethbridge and Medicine Hat, Canada. The population at last count was 649. According to the nearest town’s newspaper, 80 percent of residents are Mennonites.
But what Grassy Lake’s stub of a Wikipedia entry fails to mention is that the United States’ Drug Enforcement Agency has outed the town as a distribution hub for an international weed and coke smuggling operation linked to the Juárez cartel, one of Mexico’s deadliest drug gangs.
I contacted the DEA to find out about the devoted/bearded supply chain that brings Calgarians their party drugs. Fortunately, DEA agent Jim Schrant called me back a few minutes before the United States’ government shutdown sent his media relations department home indefinitely.
“We started investigating a large-scale marijuana and cocaine distribution group in 2010, which was operating out of Mexico and shipping large amounts into the United States and then subsequently to different points in Alberta,” Schrant explained, on the phone from theweed-friendly state of Colorado. “We learned there were individuals who identified as Mexican Mennonites involved in the transportation and distribution.”
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Mennonites in Alberta, Canada Have Cozy Relations with a Notorious Mexican Drug Cartel

From a distance Grassy Lake, Alberta doesn’t have a whole lot going on. The rural hamlet takes up less than one square mile of a prairie highway between Lethbridge and Medicine Hat, Canada. The population at last count was 649. According to the nearest town’s newspaper, 80 percent of residents are Mennonites.

But what Grassy Lake’s stub of a Wikipedia entry fails to mention is that the United States’ Drug Enforcement Agency has outed the town as a distribution hub for an international weed and coke smuggling operation linked to the Juárez cartel, one of Mexico’s deadliest drug gangs.

I contacted the DEA to find out about the devoted/bearded supply chain that brings Calgarians their party drugs. Fortunately, DEA agent Jim Schrant called me back a few minutes before the United States’ government shutdown sent his media relations department home indefinitely.

“We started investigating a large-scale marijuana and cocaine distribution group in 2010, which was operating out of Mexico and shipping large amounts into the United States and then subsequently to different points in Alberta,” Schrant explained, on the phone from theweed-friendly state of Colorado. “We learned there were individuals who identified as Mexican Mennonites involved in the transportation and distribution.”

Continue

This Anonymous Blogger Loves to Out Western Canadian Gangsters
Eleven days before Halloween someone near Ranfurly, Alberta—a place so minuscule Google Maps doesn’t bother labelling it—cut a man’s head off and left him in a ditch. The rest of him was discovered the following Wednesday, two hours west in Edmonton, inside a garbage bag in the middle of an alley.
Initially, police withheld the identity of the victim. Then, on the following Friday morning, an anonymous bloggerreleased it himself.  Hours before media would confirm the victim was 54-year-old Bob Roth, a quiet, soft-spoken manual laborer, the blogger hadn’t just identified Mr. Roth, but posited that a gang called the White Boy Posse had killed him over a drug debt.
It would be another six weeks before media and the Edmonton Police Service would confirm the allegations against the White Boy Posse (WBP), a white supremacist drug gang who embraces Nazi symbology that’s found some form of acceptance, or at least tolerance, in small Northern Alberta towns. WBP recently made international headlines after four alleged members were linked to the decapitation of Roth, the murder of Bryan Gower, and the front-door shooting of Lorry Santos, an innocent mother of four. Lorry Santos’ only mistake was answering the front door of her home. The White Boy Posse thought that her place belonged to someone else, which leads gang experts to believe they’re not the brightest Nazi medal at the flea market.
A couple of mean looking White Boy Posse members.
“They’re a bunch of whacked-out, socially awkward kids with these bizarre, racist ideas who want to sell drugs. So they go to Hell’s Angels and say, ‘We’ll kiss your butt, we’ll kiss your feet, and sell your drugs to make commission,” says Tom Jones, (not his real name, luckily) the Surrey-based blogger and creator ofGangstersout.com, which he founded in 2009 as a safe place for Canadians to out neighbors suspected of being in organized crime.
Tom Jones (or “Agent K,” named after the Tommy Lee Jones character from the Men in Black series) believes WBP is a puppet club for the Hell’s Angels. He also thinks that they entered Roth’s hometown, Lloydminster, after another Hell’s Angels farm team got busted. They’re called (seriously) The Baseball Team, and they pretend to be—so says the blogger—“just a group of guys, playing baseball.”
Continue

This Anonymous Blogger Loves to Out Western Canadian Gangsters

Eleven days before Halloween someone near Ranfurly, Alberta—a place so minuscule Google Maps doesn’t bother labelling it—cut a man’s head off and left him in a ditch. The rest of him was discovered the following Wednesday, two hours west in Edmonton, inside a garbage bag in the middle of an alley.

Initially, police withheld the identity of the victim. Then, on the following Friday morning, an anonymous bloggerreleased it himself.  Hours before media would confirm the victim was 54-year-old Bob Roth, a quiet, soft-spoken manual laborer, the blogger hadn’t just identified Mr. Roth, but posited that a gang called the White Boy Posse had killed him over a drug debt.

It would be another six weeks before media and the Edmonton Police Service would confirm the allegations against the White Boy Posse (WBP), a white supremacist drug gang who embraces Nazi symbology that’s found some form of acceptance, or at least tolerance, in small Northern Alberta towns. WBP recently made international headlines after four alleged members were linked to the decapitation of Roth, the murder of Bryan Gower, and the front-door shooting of Lorry Santos, an innocent mother of four. Lorry Santos’ only mistake was answering the front door of her home. The White Boy Posse thought that her place belonged to someone else, which leads gang experts to believe they’re not the brightest Nazi medal at the flea market.


A couple of mean looking White Boy Posse members.

“They’re a bunch of whacked-out, socially awkward kids with these bizarre, racist ideas who want to sell drugs. So they go to Hell’s Angels and say, ‘We’ll kiss your butt, we’ll kiss your feet, and sell your drugs to make commission,” says Tom Jones, (not his real name, luckily) the Surrey-based blogger and creator ofGangstersout.com, which he founded in 2009 as a safe place for Canadians to out neighbors suspected of being in organized crime.

Tom Jones (or “Agent K,” named after the Tommy Lee Jones character from the Men in Black series) believes WBP is a puppet club for the Hell’s Angels. He also thinks that they entered Roth’s hometown, Lloydminster, after another Hell’s Angels farm team got busted. They’re called (seriously) The Baseball Team, and they pretend to be—so says the blogger—“just a group of guys, playing baseball.”

Continue