How a Group of Bikers from New Zealand Planned a Road Trip Across Korea’s DMZ
For the past decade, New Zealanders Joanne and Gareth Morgan have been living the semiretired lifestyle of their dreams, traveling around the world on motorcycles alongside a few of their closest friends. They’ve traversed all seven continents on their bikes, with routes as varied as Venice to Beijing, Florida to northern Alaska, and South Africa to London, just to name a few. Gareth funds his own trips, many of which he uses to pursue philanthropic endeavors, particularly in the social-investment space. He is able to do so with money he’s made as an economist and investment manager—one who has earned the reputation for criticizing unethical practices in New Zealand’s financial-services industry.
In late August, the Morgans embarked on their most ambitious journey yet, at least physically. The real journey began years ago, when they decided they wanted to ride the Baekdudaegan, a mountain range that stretches the length of North and South Korea’s shared peninsula. After countless hours of negotiation and coordination with both governments, they were granted permission. It was, the Morgans believe, the first time anyone’s ever traveled through both countries like that since the partitioning of Korea in 1945. By making the trip they hoped to demonstrate how Koreans can come together over what they have in common. To symbolize this, the Morgans took some stones from Paektu, a holy mountain in the North, and brought them to Hallasan, a similarly sacred peak in the South.
Joanne and Gareth shot the entirety of their trip, the footage from which they have graciously allowed us to cut into a short film that will premiere on VICE.com this month. In some ways, the footage makes the Korean coast look alternately like California, China, and Cuba. It’s a beautiful view few foreigners have seen, and even if planning the road trip straight through the Demilitarized Zone required working within parameters set by the highly choreographed and restricted confines of North-South Korean diplomacy, this was a journey worth documenting from start to finish.

The Morgans pay homage to Kim Il Sung, the “liberator” of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.
VICE: Do you think negotiating your trip constituted a form of diplomacy? Would you like to be viewed as diplomats?Joanne Morgan: Gareth as a diplomat is actually quite funny. Gareth says exactly what he thinks, and I definitely wouldn’t put him into any diplomatic role.Gareth Morgan: With this trip, the real point [for us] was just to understand the Korean people. What spins their wheels? What’s their sense of identity? How are they handling this 68-year interruption to their 5,000-year history?Joanne: In the 80s, when I was standing in the DMZ on the south side looking across to the north, I saw a group of old men standing there gazing north and crying. It was very emotional and I couldn’t quite understand it. That’s always stayed with me, that huge longing that they had to reunite their families.
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How a Group of Bikers from New Zealand Planned a Road Trip Across Korea’s DMZ

For the past decade, New Zealanders Joanne and Gareth Morgan have been living the semiretired lifestyle of their dreams, traveling around the world on motorcycles alongside a few of their closest friends. They’ve traversed all seven continents on their bikes, with routes as varied as Venice to Beijing, Florida to northern Alaska, and South Africa to London, just to name a few. Gareth funds his own trips, many of which he uses to pursue philanthropic endeavors, particularly in the social-investment space. He is able to do so with money he’s made as an economist and investment manager—one who has earned the reputation for criticizing unethical practices in New Zealand’s financial-services industry.

In late August, the Morgans embarked on their most ambitious journey yet, at least physically. The real journey began years ago, when they decided they wanted to ride the Baekdudaegan, a mountain range that stretches the length of North and South Korea’s shared peninsula. After countless hours of negotiation and coordination with both governments, they were granted permission. It was, the Morgans believe, the first time anyone’s ever traveled through both countries like that since the partitioning of Korea in 1945. By making the trip they hoped to demonstrate how Koreans can come together over what they have in common. To symbolize this, the Morgans took some stones from Paektu, a holy mountain in the North, and brought them to Hallasan, a similarly sacred peak in the South.

Joanne and Gareth shot the entirety of their trip, the footage from which they have graciously allowed us to cut into a short film that will premiere on VICE.com this month. In some ways, the footage makes the Korean coast look alternately like California, China, and Cuba. It’s a beautiful view few foreigners have seen, and even if planning the road trip straight through the Demilitarized Zone required working within parameters set by the highly choreographed and restricted confines of North-South Korean diplomacy, this was a journey worth documenting from start to finish.

The Morgans pay homage to Kim Il Sung, the “liberator” of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

VICE: Do you think negotiating your trip constituted a form of diplomacy? Would you like to be viewed as diplomats?
Joanne Morgan:
 Gareth as a diplomat is actually quite funny. Gareth says exactly what he thinks, and I definitely wouldn’t put him into any diplomatic role.
Gareth Morgan: With this trip, the real point [for us] was just to understand the Korean people. What spins their wheels? What’s their sense of identity? How are they handling this 68-year interruption to their 5,000-year history?
Joanne: In the 80s, when I was standing in the DMZ on the south side looking across to the north, I saw a group of old men standing there gazing north and crying. It was very emotional and I couldn’t quite understand it. That’s always stayed with me, that huge longing that they had to reunite their families.

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Fresh off the Boat with Eddie Huang - Bay Area, Part 1 
Eddie’s first stop in the Bay Area is Oakland, where he hangs with a local biker gang that shows hipsters how to shoot guns and hunt for rabbit. After a few gruesome hours in the Oakland outback, they head back to the clubhouse to shoot the shit, throw back a few cold ones, and talk about the disconnect between people and the process it takes to put meat on their plates. Then they cook up a delicious meal of southern-style deep-fried rabbit.
Watch it here

Fresh off the Boat with Eddie Huang - Bay Area, Part 1 

Eddie’s first stop in the Bay Area is Oakland, where he hangs with a local biker gang that shows hipsters how to shoot guns and hunt for rabbit. After a few gruesome hours in the Oakland outback, they head back to the clubhouse to shoot the shit, throw back a few cold ones, and talk about the disconnect between people and the process it takes to put meat on their plates. Then they cook up a delicious meal of southern-style deep-fried rabbit.

Watch it here

In the month I spent hanging out with outlaw biker gangs in Australia, I was threatened at least three times with various grisly forms of death and/or maiming. First, a Hell’s Angel threatened to bury me on the club’s property in Broadford. Second, a Gypsy Joker said he was going to shoot me if I didn’t get the fuck away from him. And third, a Coffin Cheater told me he was going to find out where I lived and ‘come fuck me up’ if I wrote anything about his club running drugs. So I won’t. But apparently there wasn’t any good speed in Australia until the Hell’s Angels invited a couple of Oakland, Californian brothers down for a few weeks in the 80s to teach them how to build methamphetamine labs. Ever since then, bikies and drugs and women and guns have gone fairly well hand in hand in Australia and you can get a point easier than change for a twenty. One of the unwritten rules though, in every outlaw biker club in Australia, is no heroin. That’s grounds for excommunication.Read the rest at Vice Magazine: HARLEY HOUNDS - Aussie Biker Gangs Broken Down - Vice Magazine 

In the month I spent hanging out with outlaw biker gangs in Australia, I was threatened at least three times with various grisly forms of death and/or maiming. First, a Hell’s Angel threatened to bury me on the club’s property in Broadford. Second, a Gypsy Joker said he was going to shoot me if I didn’t get the fuck away from him. And third, a Coffin Cheater told me he was going to find out where I lived and ‘come fuck me up’ if I wrote anything about his club running drugs. So I won’t. But apparently there wasn’t any good speed in Australia until the Hell’s Angels invited a couple of Oakland, Californian brothers down for a few weeks in the 80s to teach them how to build methamphetamine labs. Ever since then, bikies and drugs and women and guns have gone fairly well hand in hand in Australia and you can get a point easier than change for a twenty. One of the unwritten rules though, in every outlaw biker club in Australia, is no heroin. That’s grounds for excommunication.


Read the rest at Vice Magazine: HARLEY HOUNDS - Aussie Biker Gangs Broken Down - Vice Magazine