Barbershops of Brooklyn 
Photos by Ol’ Skool Sean

Barbershops of Brooklyn 

Photos by Ol’ Skool Sean

Dustin Yellin: From Hijacking Golf Carts to Building Brooklyn’s Art Utopia

"The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in the mind at the same time, and still retain the ability to function." —F. Scott Fitzgerald (The Crack-Up)
 
Artist Dustin Yellin once cracked up.
 
One evening in 1999, he used a camcorder to document himself committing three acts of trespassing: First he wandered onto the Forbes family yacht claiming he owned it (“I think this is my boat”), then he hijacked the golf-ball-collecting cart at the Chelsea Piers driving range (“We’re going to have fun tonight.”), and then things came to an end when he got arrested for breaking into Belvedere Castle in Central Park (“I climbed up the wall because I’m going to talk to someone in the tower that I’m in love with.”).
 
Yellin pretty casually refers to the whole thing as a “psychotic breakdown,” but his behavior during the episode isn’t really all that bad, and maybe not even all that psychotic. Sure, he says some stuff that sounds fueled by a potent brew, equal parts confusion and clarity, that has you wonder if this whole adventure began with a tab of acid or two. But, pretty soon into the video, the mystery of what Yellin might be “on,” a mystery we sort of perfunctorily find ourselves trying to solve, feels unimportant.
 
Instead, what becomes engrossing are the characters who are forced to deal with Yellin. And what becomes fascinating are the reconciliation processes that take place when a guy who has cracked up encounters security guards, managers, and other minions of capital-OOrder—you know, nice folks really just trying to do their jobs. If this video clip is, in fact, a piece of art, then its artistry lies in that it reveals the incredible anatomical complexity of situations where two opposed ideas—Yellin’s seemingly ruleless reality vs. the reality where you can’t just fucking steal a golf cart—are forced to reconcile.
 
See, it’s reconciliation and the tiny miracle inherent in the very meaning of that word that Fitzgerald is talking about in the The Crack-Up, the 1936 essay that Yellin asks the guy on the driving range if he’s ever read, mid-hijacking. It’s reconciliation and the liminal space between two totally contradictory notions that characterizes Dustin Yellin, both his art andPioneer Works Center for Art and Innovation, the wildly ambitious project that has become his Magnum Opus and pretty much consumed his entire life.

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Thomas Roma talks about The Waters of Our Time, his new photo book collaboration with his son Giancarlo

Thomas Roma talks about The Waters of Our Time, his new photo book collaboration with his son Giancarlo

Brooklyn’s Domino Sugar Factory is now the site of Kara Walker’s 75’ sugar sphinx.

Brooklyn’s Domino Sugar Factory is now the site of Kara Walker’s 75’ sugar sphinx.

Mishka’s 2014 Summer Lookbook
It’s been one long-ass winter—filled with crusty lips, chapped butt cheeks, and snotty noses. But it finally looks like the cold is coming to an end, which means it’s time to switch up the gear and put away the dark puffy clothes for more colorful, Miami-coke-kingpin-type shit. Luckily, Mishka has you covered with their summer 2014 collection. The vibe of their latest pieces harkens back to that classic quirky shit that is Mishka’s bread and butter. The patterns are eccentric and subversive and have a chaotic vibe that captures the excitement of a sweltering summer in New York City.
The homies behind the ever-evolving streetwear brand have given VICE the pleasure of exclusively premiering the lookbook for their 2014 collection, which you can scroll through below. With glitchy GIFs and backgrounds that remind us of old-school pen-and-pixel art, the photos evoke the cut-and-paste pastiche that is defining cool shit right now.
Enjoy! 

Mishka’s 2014 Summer Lookbook

It’s been one long-ass winter—filled with crusty lips, chapped butt cheeks, and snotty noses. But it finally looks like the cold is coming to an end, which means it’s time to switch up the gear and put away the dark puffy clothes for more colorful, Miami-coke-kingpin-type shit. Luckily, Mishka has you covered with their summer 2014 collection. The vibe of their latest pieces harkens back to that classic quirky shit that is Mishka’s bread and butter. The patterns are eccentric and subversive and have a chaotic vibe that captures the excitement of a sweltering summer in New York City.

The homies behind the ever-evolving streetwear brand have given VICE the pleasure of exclusively premiering the lookbook for their 2014 collection, which you can scroll through below. With glitchy GIFs and backgrounds that remind us of old-school pen-and-pixel art, the photos evoke the cut-and-paste pastiche that is defining cool shit right now.

Enjoy! 

Why are so many girls wearing cat makeup on Tinder? We explored the phenomenon.

vicenews:

Bed-Stuy’s Volunteer Ambulance Service
Brooklyn’s Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood is well past the notoriety it had in the 1980s and 1990s, when the area was neglected and crack dealers violently ruled the streets. Back then, two men began providing much needed help to their underserved community. The Bed-Stuy Volunteer Ambulance Corp was founded in 1988 by Captain James “Rocky” Robinson, an EMS tech, and Specialist Joe Perez. Rocky is still at the helm today, 26 years later, training a new generation to follow in his footsteps. With the community now much safer and better served, he has changed the BSVAC’s original mission of saving lives to changing lives — helping young men and women who may not have any other options receive free training and eventually find jobs in the medical field. 
Watch the video

vicenews:

Bed-Stuy’s Volunteer Ambulance Service

Brooklyn’s Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood is well past the notoriety it had in the 1980s and 1990s, when the area was neglected and crack dealers violently ruled the streets. Back then, two men began providing much needed help to their underserved community. The Bed-Stuy Volunteer Ambulance Corp was founded in 1988 by Captain James “Rocky” Robinson, an EMS tech, and Specialist Joe Perez. Rocky is still at the helm today, 26 years later, training a new generation to follow in his footsteps. With the community now much safer and better served, he has changed the BSVAC’s original mission of saving lives to changing lives — helping young men and women who may not have any other options receive free training and eventually find jobs in the medical field. 

Watch the video

Baby DJs
Hey, how’s your baby doin’? What kind of music is it listening to? Kidz Bop? The Wiggles? Fuckin’ Raffi and shit? If you really loved your baby, you’d be dropping $200 to send it to Baby DJ School.

Baby DJs

Hey, how’s your baby doin’? What kind of music is it listening to? Kidz Bop? The Wiggles? Fuckin’ Raffi and shit? If you really loved your baby, you’d be dropping $200 to send it to Baby DJ School.

Brooklyn: Come to Joe Leavenworth’s Book Launch at VUU Studio Tonight

As photo editor of the website you are looking at right now, as well as its corresponding magazine, part of my job is keeping abreast of the goings on inside the photography world. For the most part, I’m pretty good at it. But over the past few days six separate artists have asked me if I’m planning on going to the launch of a book I had never heard of—New York-based photographer Joe Leavenworth's Native Son. Considering how many times the event has been brought up recently, it’s safe to say that either Joe has a crack viral PR team, canvassing the city spreading news of the launch via word of mouth; or his book is just so damn good people genuinely can’t help themselves from talking about it, like the Bible or A Dance with Dragons. Let’s find out together at VUU Studio tonight.

Leavenworth was born in Decatur, Georgia, adopted at birth, and raised in New England. He attempts to reconcile the dichotomy of his upbrigning by crisscrossing the southeastern United States and recording encounters, curiosities, and surfaces with his camera. The pictures in this series are warm but not overly sentimental, and all subjects are rendered sympathetically in natural light. Leavenworth draws connections between portraits, still-lives, and landscapes in a poetic way that I’m sure will benefit from the linear structure a book provides. The book is 76 pages long, bound by hand, and published by VUU in an edition of just 75 copies.

VUU Studios, Brooklyn, NY
56 Bogart ST 1st Floor
6-9pm

(Source: Vice Magazine)

We went to Brooklyn to try to communicate with the dead through Vodou. Brought to you by the new film Devil’s Due.

We went to Brooklyn to try to communicate with the dead through Vodou. Brought to you by the new film Devil’s Due.

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