Measure B Is a Pain in the Dick
Let’s not bullshit ourselves, condoms flat out suck—both in one’s private life and in pornos. They’re uncomfortable boner-ruiners and girls are always trying to put holes in them to get my babies. In porn, from a fan’s perspective, it’s just not stimulating to see a plastic bag going in and out of a girl’s mouth/butthole. I understand the need for them, but I just don’t like them and I am thankful I’m married and no longer forced to use them. Recently, a law was passed in Los Angeles that is so preposterous it could send porn stars and porn industry people to jail if they don’t use condoms, dental dams, and all sorts of other forms of safe sex in their films. The law is called Measure B (or Measure Bullshit to the folks who will be pummeled by its iron fist).
Measure B, which is really just a witch hunt and a means to run pornographers out of LA County, was proposed by the well-financed AIDS Healthcare Foundation President, Michael Weinstein. The language on the ballot was so deceptive it led voters to believe it was a law to protect the performers in the porn industry. The reality is that Measure B calls for pornographers to purchase health permits and it opens their shoots up to random inspections from the Health Department to make sure they are complying with the law. This goes for everyone, even the lowly cam girls who are in the safety of their own homes doing solo shows to help put themselves through college.
Many of my friends are both up in arms and fearful of what is to come. Director Kimberly Kane, who you know from my recent episodes of Skinema and her VICE magazine feature on Zak Smith and Mandy Morbid, is now a criminal under Measure B. She was uncharacteristically speechless when I asked her for a quote about the law. She didn’t know what to say for days. She finally told me, “Technically they’ll penalize you for breaking the law even if you’re married and performing with your spouse without a condom. Everything I do now is illegal without a permit, a condom, and probably someone on set from the Heath Department making sure that everything is up to code. I don’t know what we’re going to do. They say it’s a First Amendment violation and it could be litigation for a long time. But no one knows. Everyone is very worried. Measure B basically runs us out of town on a moral stance. They say Vegas or Nevada is an option [for relocating the industry]…”
Continue

Measure B Is a Pain in the Dick

Let’s not bullshit ourselves, condoms flat out suck—both in one’s private life and in pornos. They’re uncomfortable boner-ruiners and girls are always trying to put holes in them to get my babies. In porn, from a fan’s perspective, it’s just not stimulating to see a plastic bag going in and out of a girl’s mouth/butthole. I understand the need for them, but I just don’t like them and I am thankful I’m married and no longer forced to use them. Recently, a law was passed in Los Angeles that is so preposterous it could send porn stars and porn industry people to jail if they don’t use condoms, dental dams, and all sorts of other forms of safe sex in their films. The law is called Measure B (or Measure Bullshit to the folks who will be pummeled by its iron fist).

Measure B, which is really just a witch hunt and a means to run pornographers out of LA County, was proposed by the well-financed AIDS Healthcare Foundation President, Michael Weinstein. The language on the ballot was so deceptive it led voters to believe it was a law to protect the performers in the porn industry. The reality is that Measure B calls for pornographers to purchase health permits and it opens their shoots up to random inspections from the Health Department to make sure they are complying with the law. This goes for everyone, even the lowly cam girls who are in the safety of their own homes doing solo shows to help put themselves through college.

Many of my friends are both up in arms and fearful of what is to come. Director Kimberly Kane, who you know from my recent episodes of Skinema and her VICE magazine feature on Zak Smith and Mandy Morbid, is now a criminal under Measure B. She was uncharacteristically speechless when I asked her for a quote about the law. She didn’t know what to say for days. She finally told me, “Technically they’ll penalize you for breaking the law even if you’re married and performing with your spouse without a condom. Everything I do now is illegal without a permit, a condom, and probably someone on set from the Heath Department making sure that everything is up to code. I don’t know what we’re going to do. They say it’s a First Amendment violation and it could be litigation for a long time. But no one knows. Everyone is very worried. Measure B basically runs us out of town on a moral stance. They say Vegas or Nevada is an option [for relocating the industry]…”

Continue


ZAK LOVES MANDY -
AND THEY’LL KEEP MAKING ART AND PORN UNTIL ONE OF THEM DIES
By Kimberly Kane

I first met Zak Smith and Mandy Morbid back in 2007 while shooting a porno in the Mojave Desert. Zak “Sabbath”—his stage name—performed the role of a transient squatter, and I played a trailer-park housewife who dreamed of making it big in Hollywood. Mandy accompanied Zak on set, and we quickly became friends, darting around the property in a beat-up golf cart and taking photos of whatever caught our eye.
In the years since, Zak, Mandy, and I have worked together on a lot of strange projects. They’ve always inspired me artistically and sexually, and I’ve really come to admire their dedication to each other. Last year, Mandy was diagnosed with Ehlers–Danlos syndrome, a genetic disorder that causes loose joints, damage to blood vessels, and skin that stretches and bruises easily. Her diagnosis was a relief in some ways. For years, doctors had no idea what was causing her debilitating pain, and her health deteriorated until she was often unable to get out of bed, let alone work. Some days are better than others, but if Mandy leaves the house she must do so in a wheelchair or with a cane.
Through all of Mandy’s hardships, Zak has never left her side. And she is always there, inspiring his art. Their love is honest, real, and somehow exists gracefully in their world of disease, art, and pornography. You don’t normally bombard people you see almost every day with deeply personal questions, but Zak and Mandy have always made me curious. So when I asked whether I could document their relationship and they agreed, I knew it was also my opportunity to ask them everything I’ve ever wanted to know and then some.

VICE: You two grew up in very different environments. How did you first meet?Zak Smith: I’m from DC. I went to art school at Cooper Union, held a bunch of shitty jobs, and worked at an abortion clinic before I got a big loan and went to graduate school at Yale. I earned my MFA and started showing my paintings. Then Benny Profane, an adult-film director, got in touch with me and said it would mean a lot to him if he could use the [unofficial and unauthorized] illustrations I made for Thomas Pynchon’s book Gravity’s Rainbow in his autobiographical porno movie. I was like, “It would mean a lot to me if I could fuck all the girls in your movie.” So he asked me to send him pictures of myself, and that’s how I started performing in porno movies. Then I made a series of paintings of girls in the sex industry, and Mandy at that time was a nude model. She contacted me and said I should paint her.
Is that accurate, Mandy?Mandy Morbid: That’s kind of how it happened. I grew up in Montreal and later moved to Ottawa. I was very sick growing up so I didn’t have a bunch of shitty jobs. I was always looking for a porn site where I could express myself because Ottawa is unbelievably boring, and I didn’t like most of the websites I found. I discovered Suicide Girls and started modeling for them. Zak would sell his paintings of the other girls on the same site. I contacted him and told him I liked his art. He said he wanted to paint me, so he came to Canada for a weekend. An hour after he got off the plane we were fucking in his hotel room. A month later I was living with him in New York.
How romantic.Mandy: Or insane.
But you haven’t been with many men, right?Mandy: No, I’m extremely picky. I’ve only been with five men my whole life, and I’m 28. I was 21 when I met Zak, and I haven’t been with another man since.
CONTINUE

ZAK LOVES MANDY -

AND THEY’LL KEEP MAKING ART AND PORN UNTIL ONE OF THEM DIES

By Kimberly Kane

I first met Zak Smith and Mandy Morbid back in 2007 while shooting a porno in the Mojave Desert. Zak “Sabbath”—his stage name—performed the role of a transient squatter, and I played a trailer-park housewife who dreamed of making it big in Hollywood. Mandy accompanied Zak on set, and we quickly became friends, darting around the property in a beat-up golf cart and taking photos of whatever caught our eye.

In the years since, Zak, Mandy, and I have worked together on a lot of strange projects. They’ve always inspired me artistically and sexually, and I’ve really come to admire their dedication to each other. Last year, Mandy was diagnosed with Ehlers–Danlos syndrome, a genetic disorder that causes loose joints, damage to blood vessels, and skin that stretches and bruises easily. Her diagnosis was a relief in some ways. For years, doctors had no idea what was causing her debilitating pain, and her health deteriorated until she was often unable to get out of bed, let alone work. Some days are better than others, but if Mandy leaves the house she must do so in a wheelchair or with a cane.

Through all of Mandy’s hardships, Zak has never left her side. And she is always there, inspiring his art. Their love is honest, real, and somehow exists gracefully in their world of disease, art, and pornography. You don’t normally bombard people you see almost every day with deeply personal questions, but Zak and Mandy have always made me curious. So when I asked whether I could document their relationship and they agreed, I knew it was also my opportunity to ask them everything I’ve ever wanted to know and then some.

VICE: You two grew up in very different environments. How did you first meet?
Zak Smith
: I’m from DC. I went to art school at Cooper Union, held a bunch of shitty jobs, and worked at an abortion clinic before I got a big loan and went to graduate school at Yale. I earned my MFA and started showing my paintings. Then Benny Profane, an adult-film director, got in touch with me and said it would mean a lot to him if he could use the [unofficial and unauthorized] illustrations I made for Thomas Pynchon’s book Gravity’s Rainbow in his autobiographical porno movie. I was like, “It would mean a lot to me if I could fuck all the girls in your movie.” So he asked me to send him pictures of myself, and that’s how I started performing in porno movies. Then I made a series of paintings of girls in the sex industry, and Mandy at that time was a nude model. She contacted me and said I should paint her.

Is that accurate, Mandy?
Mandy Morbid: That’s kind of how it happened. I grew up in Montreal and later moved to Ottawa. I was very sick growing up so I didn’t have a bunch of shitty jobs. I was always looking for a porn site where I could express myself because Ottawa is unbelievably boring, and I didn’t like most of the websites I found. I discovered Suicide Girls and started modeling for them. Zak would sell his paintings of the other girls on the same site. I contacted him and told him I liked his art. He said he wanted to paint me, so he came to Canada for a weekend. An hour after he got off the plane we were fucking in his hotel room. A month later I was living with him in New York.

How romantic.
Mandy
: Or insane.

But you haven’t been with many men, right?
Mandy
: No, I’m extremely picky. I’ve only been with five men my whole life, and I’m 28. I was 21 when I met Zak, and I haven’t been with another man since.

Skinema delves into the dirty secrets of the dirty movie industry. Watch the premiere episode here. 

Skinema delves into the dirty secrets of the dirty movie industry. Watch the premiere episode here

For more than a decade Chris Nieratko has been “reviewing” porn for VICE in his Skinema column. (It spawned a VICE book of the same name.) We now welcome you to the first episode of Chris’s new show,Skinema, where you’ll get a behind-the-scenes look into the lives of the most famous adult stars.

The subject of the first episode is the lovely and talented porn actress/director/photographer Kimberly Kane. She was nearly choked to death her first time on a porn set. We learn all about her entrance into smut and the secret to giving a good blow job. We also get to watch Ms. Kane attempt a butt sex scene with an Italian stallion. Enjoy.

In advance of tomorrow’s Skinema premiere, read Chris Nieratko’s AIM chat with Kimberly Kane.

In advance of tomorrow’s Skinema premiere, read Chris Nieratko’s AIM chat with Kimberly Kane.

GIRLS OF HOLLYWOOD - MAKING IT IN LA-LA LAND, FROM FANTASY TO REALITY By Kimberly Kane
When I was a teenager living in Portland, Oregon, my mom would visit bands, friends, and men in Los Angeles, and I was often invited along. We’d have adventures with what I now know were high-priced escorts and rock stars’ girlfriends at various bars and fancy hotels. I’d take pictures, but mostly I would just hang out. My mom secured me a fake ID so I could join the group and get into shows. 
I was fascinated with LA at an early age. After I turned 18, my mother introduced me to her friend Rose, and we formed a friendship based on drugs. Rose had to leave Portland when the FBI hit her boyfriend with embezzlement charges. She knew the feds would soon come after her assets, as they were acquired through his illegal activity. So my half brother, Rose, and I drove a U-Haul full of her stuff down to California. Afterward, my brother went back up north and I stayed behind with Rose. 
In 2003, I was dancing at strip clubs, and Rose, living off the money she got from selling two Porsches her boyfriend had bought her, was running low on funds. When the FBI showed up to repo her stuff, she started making connections in the porn business. 
One day, she asked whether I wanted to accompany her to a porn set to pick up a check she was owed. I had preconceived notions about pornography, and I was sure we were on our way to a filthy back-alley motel to meet some Lester Diamond character. But in reality, our destination was a big mansion in Malibu where everyone used to shoot back then. The house was buzzing with activity and a free-spirited vibe, which I imagine is similar to the feeling you’d get walking into a nudist colony. Rose disappeared almost immediately, and I wandered over to watch a sex scene being filmed. What I saw was a cute girl named Emily DeVinci riding this beefcake on the stairwell. She noticed me and said, “If you’re going to watch me fuck, you have to take off your shirt.” So I did. I thought it was standard practice for a visitor to be naked in that type of environment, when in fact she just wanted to see my tits. 
The director saw what was going down and slithered over to talk to me. In hindsight, now that I’m a porn director, I would have done the same thing. Fresh meat walking around the set topless is an easy target. He asked whether I would be interested in doing a scene. I said yes.
This was the beginning of my life as I know it now. A life where I’d never made so much money or had so much freedom. Hollywood became my home and has been ever since. I feel I’ve always belonged in this city. I think a lot of people here feel the same way.

Andy San Dimas, 25 (pictured above)adult performer, model
Growing up in rural Maryland, I only knew LA through TV but I never got to visit because my family couldn’t afford to travel. My parents were also super-religious, so I really didn’t get to do much of anything. I saw what happened to people who stayed in my hometown—married with three kids by 25—and I didn’t want to be that. I wanted an exciting and even weird life, far away from my tiny little town. When I turned 18, I started working at a porn shop, and I came across an ad for an alt-porn brand where the girls looked like me. I sent the first nude pic I had ever taken of myself to my favorite director, then I moved to LA, and my life hasn’t been the same since.

Continue

GIRLS OF HOLLYWOOD - MAKING IT IN LA-LA LAND, FROM FANTASY TO REALITY By Kimberly Kane

When I was a teenager living in Portland, Oregon, my mom would visit bands, friends, and men in Los Angeles, and I was often invited along. We’d have adventures with what I now know were high-priced escorts and rock stars’ girlfriends at various bars and fancy hotels. I’d take pictures, but mostly I would just hang out. My mom secured me a fake ID so I could join the group and get into shows. 

I was fascinated with LA at an early age. After I turned 18, my mother introduced me to her friend Rose, and we formed a friendship based on drugs. Rose had to leave Portland when the FBI hit her boyfriend with embezzlement charges. She knew the feds would soon come after her assets, as they were acquired through his illegal activity. So my half brother, Rose, and I drove a U-Haul full of her stuff down to California. Afterward, my brother went back up north and I stayed behind with Rose. 

In 2003, I was dancing at strip clubs, and Rose, living off the money she got from selling two Porsches her boyfriend had bought her, was running low on funds. When the FBI showed up to repo her stuff, she started making connections in the porn business. 

One day, she asked whether I wanted to accompany her to a porn set to pick up a check she was owed. I had preconceived notions about pornography, and I was sure we were on our way to a filthy back-alley motel to meet some Lester Diamond character. But in reality, our destination was a big mansion in Malibu where everyone used to shoot back then. The house was buzzing with activity and a free-spirited vibe, which I imagine is similar to the feeling you’d get walking into a nudist colony. Rose disappeared almost immediately, and I wandered over to watch a sex scene being filmed. What I saw was a cute girl named Emily DeVinci riding this beefcake on the stairwell. She noticed me and said, “If you’re going to watch me fuck, you have to take off your shirt.” So I did. I thought it was standard practice for a visitor to be naked in that type of environment, when in fact she just wanted to see my tits. 

The director saw what was going down and slithered over to talk to me. In hindsight, now that I’m a porn director, I would have done the same thing. Fresh meat walking around the set topless is an easy target. He asked whether I would be interested in doing a scene. I said yes.

This was the beginning of my life as I know it now. A life where I’d never made so much money or had so much freedom. Hollywood became my home and has been ever since. I feel I’ve always belonged in this city. I think a lot of people here feel the same way.

Andy San Dimas, 25 (pictured above)
adult performer, model

Growing up in rural Maryland, I only knew LA through TV but I never got to visit because my family couldn’t afford to travel. My parents were also super-religious, so I really didn’t get to do much of anything. I saw what happened to people who stayed in my hometown—married with three kids by 25—and I didn’t want to be that. I wanted an exciting and even weird life, far away from my tiny little town. When I turned 18, I started working at a porn shop, and I came across an ad for an alt-porn brand where the girls looked like me. I sent the first nude pic I had ever taken of myself to my favorite director, then I moved to LA, and my life hasn’t been the same since.

Continue