Waiting for al-Quaeda: Will radical Islam take over in Libya? Watch Part 1 of our report from the ground.

Waiting for al-Quaeda: Will radical Islam take over in Libya? Watch Part 1 of our report from the ground.

Al Qaeda’s flag can now be seen atop Benghazi’s courthouse. We have a feeling that this won’t end well.

Al Qaeda’s flag can now be seen atop Benghazi’s courthouse. We have a feeling that this won’t end well.

Public Opinion: Should We Have Been Allowed To See Gaddafi’s Dead Face?

Public Opinion: Should We Have Been Allowed To See Gaddafi’s Dead Face?


After months of fighting in Libya following the Arab Spring uprisings, Muammar Gaddafi is dead. What his legacy is in the annals of history has yet to be determined. We can say that there will likely be footnotes in his sections of history books dedicated to explaining his crazy faces and obsession with fancy eyewear.
I’m not sure why but it seemed a crucial aspect of being a dictator in the latter half of the 20th century to wear designer sunglasses at all times. I’m not sure if it’s a wink and a nod to how filthy rich these guys get by embezzling the guts out of their already-strained public coffers, or if there’s some sort of inter-dictator sunglass competition going on. It may just be that they can’t stand to view the glare of their starving populaces unless their eyes are shielded by thousands of dollars worth of Prada and Hennessy. Until some sociologists dedicate themselves to sunglasses research, we’ll just have to decide on our own. To kickstart the scholarly debate, I’ve rounded up my top eight shades-wearing dictators from recent history.

Continue: Shades of Evil - The Best in Dictatorial Eyewear

After months of fighting in Libya following the Arab Spring uprisings, Muammar Gaddafi is dead. What his legacy is in the annals of history has yet to be determined. We can say that there will likely be footnotes in his sections of history books dedicated to explaining his crazy faces and obsession with fancy eyewear.

I’m not sure why but it seemed a crucial aspect of being a dictator in the latter half of the 20th century to wear designer sunglasses at all times. I’m not sure if it’s a wink and a nod to how filthy rich these guys get by embezzling the guts out of their already-strained public coffers, or if there’s some sort of inter-dictator sunglass competition going on. It may just be that they can’t stand to view the glare of their starving populaces unless their eyes are shielded by thousands of dollars worth of Prada and Hennessy. Until some sociologists dedicate themselves to sunglasses research, we’ll just have to decide on our own. To kickstart the scholarly debate, I’ve rounded up my top eight shades-wearing dictators from recent history.

Continue: Shades of Evil - The Best in Dictatorial Eyewear

One 15-year-old boy I met was preparing a Grad-missile truck for battle. Beaming, he wondered whether I could “ask Clinton and Obama for new weapons” so that they could beat Gaddafi and he could fulfill his dream of playing for the Miami Heat or the Dallas Mavericks.”

The Rebels of Libya, Part  5

VICE’s latest documentary, On The Front Lines With Libyan Rebels, is now playing on CNN.

VICE’s latest documentary, On The Front Lines With Libyan Rebels, is now playing on CNN.


I’m discovering that war journalism is a lot like surfing: 99 percent paddling out to sea, 1 percent riding a wave that could crush you at any time. The newest rumor was that Sert, Gaddafi’s hometown, had just fallen. Journalists ran out of the hotel in a herd. Anything seemed possible, which prompted me to finally borrow a flak jacket and helmet. Curiously it’s mostly the television journalists who are wearing protection. Maybe the print guys are just looking for an easy way out of their perishing industry, or perhaps TV correspondents don the gear for dramatic effect as they stand sheepishly in front of the camera. The older journalist I was with offered her set to the driver, because it’s almost always the person guiding reporters around who gets shot. 
Read the rest at Vice Magazine: NOTES FROM A LIBYAN LURKER IV - TAILGATING IN BEN JAWAD - Viceland Today 

I’m discovering that war journalism is a lot like surfing: 99 percent paddling out to sea, 1 percent riding a wave that could crush you at any time. The newest rumor was that Sert, Gaddafi’s hometown, had just fallen. Journalists ran out of the hotel in a herd. Anything seemed possible, which prompted me to finally borrow a flak jacket and helmet. Curiously it’s mostly the television journalists who are wearing protection. Maybe the print guys are just looking for an easy way out of their perishing industry, or perhaps TV correspondents don the gear for dramatic effect as they stand sheepishly in front of the camera. The older journalist I was with offered her set to the driver, because it’s almost always the person guiding reporters around who gets shot. 



Read the rest at Vice Magazine: NOTES FROM A LIBYAN LURKER IV - TAILGATING IN BEN JAWAD - Viceland Today 


One of my friends who had been in Benghazi for a few weeks told me that it wasn’t smooth sailing. The rebels continued to impress everyone with their enthusiasm and willingness to throw themselves at Gaddafi’s forces, but there was a perpetually lingering threat that the frontline would be overrun. It was dangerous after dark, money was running low, and the UN was dithering about air strikes. Then finally, against all hopes, they followed through. 
Read the rest at Vice Magazine: NOTES FROM A LIBYAN LURKER - THE PRISONERS - Viceland Today 

One of my friends who had been in Benghazi for a few weeks told me that it wasn’t smooth sailing. The rebels continued to impress everyone with their enthusiasm and willingness to throw themselves at Gaddafi’s forces, but there was a perpetually lingering threat that the frontline would be overrun. It was dangerous after dark, money was running low, and the UN was dithering about air strikes. Then finally, against all hopes, they followed through. 



Read the rest at Vice Magazine: NOTES FROM A LIBYAN LURKER - THE PRISONERS - Viceland Today 

More Photos from Libya

More Photos from Libya

More Photos from Libya

More Photos from Libya

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