Alice Cooper’s Dead Drunk Friends
by Alice Cooper, as told to Legs McNeil 
I first met Alice Cooper at a party on Park Avenue in the mid-1970s. It was really one of those, “I’m not worthy” moments. Alice was one of the few guys I truly respected back then, because he’d made it on his own terms: by “driving a stake into the heart of the peace-and-love Generation,” and by playing delinquent rock ‘n’ roll for punks like me. That night on Park Avenue, Alice invited me to interview him, so we sat down for a long session at his place in Bel Air a few days later. Alice was deeply disturbed by what he’d heard about some of the punk bands, telling me, “I don’t get this scene, I mean, do they wanna make money or don’t they?”
I explained that yes, they did want to make money, but they wanted to do it on their own terms like he’d done. Alice was relieved that the punks wanted to make money—and so we’ve remained friends ever since. He’s just finishing a new album of cover songs by all his old friends from the Hollywood Vampires, the old drinking club he conducted at the Rainbow in LA that included Harry Nilsson, John Lennon, Ringo, Micky Dolenz, Keith Moon, and Jim Morrison, among other rock luminaries, I called him up to talk about some of his old pals.
 HOLLYWOOD VAMPIRES
When we put the Hollywood Vampires together, it was sort of a tribute to the old Hollywood drinking clubs, like when John Barrymore, Errol Flynn, and W.C. Fields would drink every night. So I said, “Well, we do that anyways, so let’s just go down to the Rainbow and drink…”        
Pretty soon it was a thing called the Hollywood Vampires, and we would go up to the top of the Rainbow and sit there and drink. Every night it was Harry Nilsson, Bernie Taupin, Micky Dolenz, myself, and whoever else would show up. Ringo was there once in awhile. Keith Moon came when he was in town.
John Lennon would come too. He and Harry Nilsson were the best of friends, ya know? So if Harry was in town, he was always with John, and they’d come over. He was great! John was just another one of the guys, ya know?        
But the really fun thing to do was to see what Keith Moon was gonna wear that night. One night he’d be in an Adolf Hitler outfit and the next he’d be the Queen of England. I mean he would go all out, Keith was the full package, and the greatest drummer I’ve ever seen in my life.        

Keith was everybody’s best friend. When he was in town, he would stay at my house for a week, then go to Harry Nilsson’s for a week, and then stay at Ringo’s for a week. There was nobody like him. I always tell people, 30% of what you’ve heard about me is true, 30% of what you hear about Iggy is true, 30% of Prince is true, whatever… but everything you’ve heard about Keith Moon is true.        
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Alice Cooper’s Dead Drunk Friends

by Alice Cooper, as told to Legs McNeil 

I first met Alice Cooper at a party on Park Avenue in the mid-1970s. It was really one of those, “I’m not worthy” moments. Alice was one of the few guys I truly respected back then, because he’d made it on his own terms: by “driving a stake into the heart of the peace-and-love Generation,” and by playing delinquent rock ‘n’ roll for punks like me. That night on Park Avenue, Alice invited me to interview him, so we sat down for a long session at his place in Bel Air a few days later. Alice was deeply disturbed by what he’d heard about some of the punk bands, telling me, “I don’t get this scene, I mean, do they wanna make money or don’t they?”

I explained that yes, they did want to make money, but they wanted to do it on their own terms like he’d done. Alice was relieved that the punks wanted to make money—and so we’ve remained friends ever since. He’s just finishing a new album of cover songs by all his old friends from the Hollywood Vampires, the old drinking club he conducted at the Rainbow in LA that included Harry Nilsson, John Lennon, Ringo, Micky Dolenz, Keith Moon, and Jim Morrison, among other rock luminaries, I called him up to talk about some of his old pals.

 HOLLYWOOD VAMPIRES

When we put the Hollywood Vampires together, it was sort of a tribute to the old Hollywood drinking clubs, like when John Barrymore, Errol Flynn, and W.C. Fields would drink every night. So I said, “Well, we do that anyways, so let’s just go down to the Rainbow and drink…”        

Pretty soon it was a thing called the Hollywood Vampires, and we would go up to the top of the Rainbow and sit there and drink. Every night it was Harry Nilsson, Bernie Taupin, Micky Dolenz, myself, and whoever else would show up. Ringo was there once in awhile. Keith Moon came when he was in town.

John Lennon would come too. He and Harry Nilsson were the best of friends, ya know? So if Harry was in town, he was always with John, and they’d come over. He was great! John was just another one of the guys, ya know?        

But the really fun thing to do was to see what Keith Moon was gonna wear that night. One night he’d be in an Adolf Hitler outfit and the next he’d be the Queen of England. I mean he would go all out, Keith was the full package, and the greatest drummer I’ve ever seen in my life.        

Keith was everybody’s best friend. When he was in town, he would stay at my house for a week, then go to Harry Nilsson’s for a week, and then stay at Ringo’s for a week. There was nobody like him. I always tell people, 30% of what you’ve heard about me is true, 30% of what you hear about Iggy is true, 30% of Prince is true, whatever… but everything you’ve heard about Keith Moon is true.        

Continue

The ATL Twins Take Us Behind the Scenes of the ‘Spring Breakers’ Premiere in LA
Here we are on the red carpet with our fine-ass fucking French bombshell and our new weirdo homie Marilyn Manson! We scared all the Selena Gomez fans! We heard them say, “Manson’s so gross and creepy! Also, ewww who are those twins?” It was amazing!

The ATL Twins Take Us Behind the Scenes of the ‘Spring Breakers’ Premiere in LA

Here we are on the red carpet with our fine-ass fucking French bombshell and our new weirdo homie Marilyn Manson! We scared all the Selena Gomez fans! We heard them say, “Manson’s so gross and creepy! Also, ewww who are those twins?” It was amazing!

Skype Dinner with Marilyn Manson: He Had Eel
VICE: Do you see beauty in the grotesque?

Marilyn Manson: The more morbid something is for me, or grotesque, the more inherent curiosity it can generate in others I think. A primal, sexy allure of ritual, and animal level thinking. I’m pulled to darkness, the secret’s out.
 


Your shows enact a blood-pageantry. Or something. When I see your videos, some of the imagery, you don’t want to see, but you can’t turn away. Like skewering the woman’s cheek in that video. I’m like, “I can’t believe he’s ckeek-fucking her with a shish kabob skewer.” But I couldn’t stop watching. That whole video for “Overneath the Path of Misery.” Unsettling, and captivating.


If you’re curious, you’re turned on. I think it’s effective. I’m interested in engaging people that are curious about the morbid side, sure. The more grotesque something is, the more chance it has to be perfect. The more grotesque something is, the less it has to hide, the more open it is.”

 
Are you into doom?

Not doom so much. Not death. Lately I’ve been into getting people excited about what they want to do. You can look at things symbolically, sure. The ultimate doom is what, death, right? Death can be seen as the ultimate orgasm. The final climax. I’m into climaxes [laughs]. I’m also into building tension and drawing it out. The more tension, the bigger the climax.
Read the whole thing

Skype Dinner with Marilyn Manson: He Had Eel

VICE: Do you see beauty in the grotesque?
Marilyn Manson: The more morbid something is for me, or grotesque, the more inherent curiosity it can generate in others I think. A primal, sexy allure of ritual, and animal level thinking. I’m pulled to darkness, the secret’s out.
 

Your shows enact a blood-pageantry. Or something. When I see your videos, some of the imagery, you don’t want to see, but you can’t turn away. Like skewering the woman’s cheek in that video. I’m like, “I can’t believe he’s ckeek-fucking her with a shish kabob skewer.” But I couldn’t stop watching. That whole video for “Overneath the Path of Misery.” Unsettling, and captivating.

If you’re curious, you’re turned on. I think it’s effective. I’m interested in engaging people that are curious about the morbid side, sure. The more grotesque something is, the more chance it has to be perfect. The more grotesque something is, the less it has to hide, the more open it is.”

 
Are you into doom?
Not doom so much. Not death. Lately I’ve been into getting people excited about what they want to do. You can look at things symbolically, sure. The ultimate doom is what, death, right? Death can be seen as the ultimate orgasm. The final climax. I’m into climaxes [laughs]. I’m also into building tension and drawing it out. The more tension, the bigger the climax.

Read the whole thing