munchies:

Fuck, That’s Delicious: New York Volume Two
Watch Action Bronson take us on one of the most unreal, out of bounds New York City food tours that’s ever been committed on film.

munchies:

Fuck, That’s Delicious: New York Volume Two

Watch Action Bronson take us on one of the most unreal, out of bounds New York City food tours that’s ever been committed on film.

noiseymusic:

Watch the final installment of “SVDDXNLY,’ and get pizza with A$AP Mob.  

Watch now on Noisey. 

noiseymusic:

Listen to “Easy Rider,” the New Single from Action Bronson

When I was little, I used to sit with my fingers quivering over the “REC” and “PLAY” buttons, ready to record the latest joint by whoever, just so I could rock it on my walkman later. It was a long time ago so who gave a shit if it sounded like poo; I just wanted to have it and know the words before my other homies did. Nowaways, everything’s being recorded, so a dub off of the radio isn’t really all that special, and more annoying than anything. 

Today, Action Bronson dropped his first single from Mr. Wonderful, “Easy Rider,” with an unceremonious release to radio, prompting the internets to go buckwild and post every grade-B, sub-par dub of the track ever to be played out of a tin can. Noisey won’t play you like that though. Here’s that real real real version, that professional shit.  Because we love you and you deserve only the best.

Get it at iTunes

(Source: Vice Magazine)

munchies:

Fuck, That’s Delicious: Episode 3
Watch Action Bronson hit the streets of London in the new episode of ‘Fuck, That’s Delicious.’

munchies:

Fuck, That’s Delicious: Episode 3

Watch Action Bronson hit the streets of London in the new episode of ‘Fuck, That’s Delicious.’

Only Blog Can Judge Me: The Tupac Musical 'Holler if Ya Hear Me' Is a Buzzfeed Listicle on Broadway
I grew up in basements. Eating pepperoni Hot Pockets and playing SEGA Dreamcast. Staring at buddy lists and Kazaa progress bars. Waiting for nine-minute scenes of Jenna Jameson, blonde and smooth and ferocious, a carnivore and an angel simultaneously, crawling toward a hard dick, mouth half-open, sweaty hairs stuck to her temples, giving orders and begging for more, wiping cum off of her eyelids.
My friend’s dad worked late at a factory that manufactured tampons. Sometimes we took lacquer from the garage and poured it into his dad’s empty beer bottles. We took off our socks and shoved them into the bottles and lit the socks on fire. Sometimes the bottles were the Smirnoff Ice his stepmom drank. My friend said only pussies and girls drank Smirnoff Ice. I wondered if there was an identity one could have in high school besides pussy or girl or god or janitor. I wondered if I would like Smirnoff Ice. Then we threw the bottles against the stone wall behind the house and watched them explode.
I went home and fell asleep on the couch. The next day I told people I’d been reading something by a dead guy who was Danish or Russian or had a mustache. Usually I was still eating Hot Pockets. Here was high school: shameless deception; processed carbohydrates; surrendering to beautiful women; destroying things simply to be reminded that I was not the only thing that could be destroyed.
And I listened to Tupac at high volumes. 
Continue

Only Blog Can Judge Me: The Tupac Musical 'Holler if Ya Hear Me' Is a Buzzfeed Listicle on Broadway

I grew up in basements. Eating pepperoni Hot Pockets and playing SEGA Dreamcast. Staring at buddy lists and Kazaa progress bars. Waiting for nine-minute scenes of Jenna Jameson, blonde and smooth and ferocious, a carnivore and an angel simultaneously, crawling toward a hard dick, mouth half-open, sweaty hairs stuck to her temples, giving orders and begging for more, wiping cum off of her eyelids.

My friend’s dad worked late at a factory that manufactured tampons. Sometimes we took lacquer from the garage and poured it into his dad’s empty beer bottles. We took off our socks and shoved them into the bottles and lit the socks on fire. Sometimes the bottles were the Smirnoff Ice his stepmom drank. My friend said only pussies and girls drank Smirnoff Ice. I wondered if there was an identity one could have in high school besides pussy or girl or god or janitor. I wondered if I would like Smirnoff Ice. Then we threw the bottles against the stone wall behind the house and watched them explode.

I went home and fell asleep on the couch. The next day I told people I’d been reading something by a dead guy who was Danish or Russian or had a mustache. Usually I was still eating Hot Pockets. Here was high school: shameless deception; processed carbohydrates; surrendering to beautiful women; destroying things simply to be reminded that I was not the only thing that could be destroyed.

And I listened to Tupac at high volumes. 

Continue

munchies:

Fuck, That’s Delicious: Episode 2
The second episode of Fuck, That’s Delicious is a great example of what happens when a Queens-born Albanian rap star gets his cousin out of jail on bail, and then brings him on a rap/eating tour ranging from Florida to Pennsylvania. Join Action Bronson and aforementioned cousin, Big Body Bes, along with a diverse cast of characters as they demolish audiences and sandwiches alike.
Watch

munchies:

Fuck, That’s Delicious: Episode 2

The second episode of Fuck, That’s Delicious is a great example of what happens when a Queens-born Albanian rap star gets his cousin out of jail on bail, and then brings him on a rap/eating tour ranging from Florida to Pennsylvania. Join Action Bronson and aforementioned cousin, Big Body Bes, along with a diverse cast of characters as they demolish audiences and sandwiches alike.

Watch

Stream Satisfaction Guaranteed, the new debut album from Junglepussy – VICE Premiere
Early into the second song on Junglepussy’s excellent debut album Satisfaction Guaranteed she raps, “How dope is this? Teach you how to grow and live.” The line—rapped quickly, with her rollicking flow, kind of like a slinky expanding and contracting with each breath—also works as Junglepussy’s motto. She’s here to please you, help you, teach you and, most importantly, introduce you to her tropical lifestyle.
It took nearly two years since her first song, “Cream Team” and even Erykah Badu asking for more, but the 22-year-old FIT-student formerly known as Shayna McHale finally came through with a self-help album for the people. “I wasn’t like I want to make music so that I could be amazing and everybody would love me,” she said when we met yesterday afternoon during a quick interview. “People really wanted me to do it. The people were asking me to share my thoughts and views on things and I can’t deny them of that.”
On Satisfaction Guaranteed, Junglepussy teaches you how to eat, date, text, and live the life of a take-no-shit power bitch, all over a set of lush, deep and dark Shy Guy beats. Girls, take notes. Guys, try not to catch too many feelings. Everyone—put this on heavy rotations for maximum effect.
Listen

Stream Satisfaction Guaranteed, the new debut album from Junglepussy – VICE Premiere

Early into the second song on Junglepussy’s excellent debut album Satisfaction Guaranteed she raps, “How dope is this? Teach you how to grow and live.” The line—rapped quickly, with her rollicking flow, kind of like a slinky expanding and contracting with each breath—also works as Junglepussy’s motto. She’s here to please you, help you, teach you and, most importantly, introduce you to her tropical lifestyle.

It took nearly two years since her first song, “Cream Team” and even Erykah Badu asking for more, but the 22-year-old FIT-student formerly known as Shayna McHale finally came through with a self-help album for the people. “I wasn’t like I want to make music so that I could be amazing and everybody would love me,” she said when we met yesterday afternoon during a quick interview. “People really wanted me to do it. The people were asking me to share my thoughts and views on things and I can’t deny them of that.”

On Satisfaction Guaranteed, Junglepussy teaches you how to eat, date, text, and live the life of a take-no-shit power bitch, all over a set of lush, deep and dark Shy Guy beats. Girls, take notes. Guys, try not to catch too many feelings. Everyone—put this on heavy rotations for maximum effect.

Listen

Fresh 2 Deaf: Prinz-D Is the First Rapper Who Can’t Hear Shit
I don’t know why it’s still so shocking for people to accept that deaf kids are into music too. I recently attended a spring formal at Gallaudet University—a private school for the deaf and hard of hearing in Washington, DC—and there was a full-on dance party going on. The room was stuffed with pulsating human bodies, although the floor was a bit brighter than most. Students were excitedly waving their hands in each others’ faces. Each person was having a unique aural experience—some appreciating the high frequencies, others the low tones, and several nothing more than the vibrations.
The night’s DJ segment quieted and the stage cleared for a handsome young man in all white—Darius McCall, a.k.a. Prinz-D—coolly holding the mic to his side. As the vibrations ignited, he translated what he rapped into American Sign Language, wading through throngs of folks absolutely losing it.
Prinz-D started rapping when he was nine. Curling red A’s tattoo both arms, homages to his homestate of Alabama. He’s profoundly deaf in both ears, and calls his hearing aid his “bread and butter… without it, I’m toast.” A few weeks ago I hit him up on Gchat to talk about his career, dating, couchsurfing, and the intensely dark imagery in his videos.
VICE: You call yourself “The First Deaf Rapper.” It’s evident that your deafness is a huge part of your artistic identity. What challenges have you experienced in the entertainment industry that might be unique to the deaf community?Prinz-D: Trying not to use sign language on every shot in a video shoot! The majority of my audience is deaf, and I have to sign for them or they lose interest. So I try to keep it hearing or mainstream and add splotches of signing here and there to show where I came from.
I just watched your videos for “You Were My Everything" and "Me Crazie.” They’re kind of dark. I envisioned them that way. These are what I was feeling at the time. I’m past that, but I was looking for controversial videos to do and it was set up right. Plus, I was trying to make a story about them. These feelings were authentic, they just never materialized.
What kind of feelings?How can [a woman] not want go out with me? That and I’m struggling to make ends meet with the kind of career I’m pursuing.
Continue

Fresh 2 Deaf: Prinz-D Is the First Rapper Who Can’t Hear Shit

I don’t know why it’s still so shocking for people to accept that deaf kids are into music too. I recently attended a spring formal at Gallaudet University—a private school for the deaf and hard of hearing in Washington, DC—and there was a full-on dance party going on. The room was stuffed with pulsating human bodies, although the floor was a bit brighter than most. Students were excitedly waving their hands in each others’ faces. Each person was having a unique aural experience—some appreciating the high frequencies, others the low tones, and several nothing more than the vibrations.

The night’s DJ segment quieted and the stage cleared for a handsome young man in all white—Darius McCall, a.k.a. Prinz-D—coolly holding the mic to his side. As the vibrations ignited, he translated what he rapped into American Sign Language, wading through throngs of folks absolutely losing it.

Prinz-D started rapping when he was nine. Curling red A’s tattoo both arms, homages to his homestate of Alabama. He’s profoundly deaf in both ears, and calls his hearing aid his “bread and butter… without it, I’m toast.” A few weeks ago I hit him up on Gchat to talk about his career, dating, couchsurfing, and the intensely dark imagery in his videos.

VICE: You call yourself “The First Deaf Rapper.” It’s evident that your deafness is a huge part of your artistic identity. What challenges have you experienced in the entertainment industry that might be unique to the deaf community?
Prinz-D: Trying not to use sign language on every shot in a video shoot! The majority of my audience is deaf, and I have to sign for them or they lose interest. So I try to keep it hearing or mainstream and add splotches of signing here and there to show where I came from.

I just watched your videos for “You Were My Everything" and "Me Crazie.” They’re kind of dark. 
I envisioned them that way. These are what I was feeling at the time. I’m past that, but I was looking for controversial videos to do and it was set up right. Plus, I was trying to make a story about them. These feelings were authentic, they just never materialized.

What kind of feelings?
How can [a woman] not want go out with me? That and I’m struggling to make ends meet with the kind of career I’m pursuing.

Continue

noiseymusic:





Join Deniro Farrar at SOB’s in NYC (204 Varick St in Manhattan) on May 19th when he celebrates his new Rebirth EP! Doors are at 7PM and you can RSVP HERE to get in FOR FREE.
 
Reminder, you can pre-order the Rebirth EP or purchase it 5/19 and bring your proof of purchase to the show for a chance to stay for a meet & greet with Deniro.
ICYMI, catch up with Deniro’s Cult Rap series HERE.

noiseymusic:

Join Deniro Farrar at SOB’s in NYC (204 Varick St in Manhattan) on May 19th when he celebrates his new Rebirth EP! Doors are at 7PM and you can RSVP HERE to get in FOR FREE.

 

Reminder, you can pre-order the Rebirth EP or purchase it 5/19 and bring your proof of purchase to the show for a chance to stay for a meet & greet with Deniro.

ICYMI, catch up with Deniro’s Cult Rap series HERE.

noiseymusic:

Deniro Farrar – Cult Rap, Part 4

In the final installment of our investigation into Cult Rap, Deniro Farrar discusses fatherhood and what sets Cult Rap apart from the mainstream. 
 
Music from this episode is from Deniro’s upcoming “Rebirth” EP, out May 20, 2014, and is available NOW for pre-order on iTunes
 

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