Welcome to VICE Sports



So what exactly can one expect to see in this new space? An abundance of compelling original video content along with insightful commentary that will more often than not be presented in a glaringly honest fashion. The spirit of this site is really all about original thought and embracing the complicated mess that is the world of sports.
While a topic like skateboarding might be the first to come to mind when you hear a mention of VICE and sports, what we’re doing with this space leaps far beyond that. We will be covering all the major sports along with the unique and unusual that you’ve come to expect from VICE.
Please follow the fun by subscribing to our YouTube channel and our Twitter feed, and please don’t be shy in providing us with feedback. Glowing thoughts and harsh opinions are not only welcomed, but encouraged.
We also strongly recommend meeting the new Delonte West and taking in Marshawn Lynch’s ridiculous teeth tales. 
We’re pretty confident you will not be disappointed.
Thanks for joining us.

Welcome to VICE Sports

So what exactly can one expect to see in this new space? An abundance of compelling original video content along with insightful commentary that will more often than not be presented in a glaringly honest fashion. The spirit of this site is really all about original thought and embracing the complicated mess that is the world of sports.

While a topic like skateboarding might be the first to come to mind when you hear a mention of VICE and sports, what we’re doing with this space leaps far beyond that. We will be covering all the major sports along with the unique and unusual that you’ve come to expect from VICE.

Please follow the fun by subscribing to our YouTube channel and our Twitter feed, and please don’t be shy in providing us with feedback. Glowing thoughts and harsh opinions are not only welcomed, but encouraged.

We also strongly recommend meeting the new Delonte West and taking in Marshawn Lynch’s ridiculous teeth tales

We’re pretty confident you will not be disappointed.

Thanks for joining us.

(Source: Vice Magazine)

vicenews:

The World Cup is a month away and 4,000 families are squatting outside the stadium in São Paulo.

vicenews:

The World Cup is a month away and 4,000 families are squatting outside the stadium in São Paulo.

Rise as One: “The People’s Game”

Click “CC” on the video player for subtitles

China has never had much luck promoting football. You don’t often see it played on the streets, in backyards, or schoolyards. Yet there are growing grassroots football sub-cultures developing in unexpected places. We travel with one of Beijing’s most prestigious independent teams to a Naxi village in the rural southwest to see what happens when old and new China mix on the pitch.

Watch the entire series at http://www.riseasone.com

Dodging Bullets with Syrian Rebels Who Love Soccer and Adolf Hitler
As he does every morning, Amir wakes me by asking if I would like to die with him. “I can take you to Damascus, but we won’t survive. We’ll go to Allah together, you and me, as martyrs,” he says, grinning as though we both had nothing better to do today, or any other day, than buy the farm.
“Forget it, Amir,” I say. “I’m not in a dying mood.” It was a long night of soccer—Dortmund vs. Malaga. I shake my head and try to shake the pins and needles from my limbs. “Not today!”
Sooner or later, I want to see Damascus. But I want to see it alive. Amir is 22 and hates waiting. He is always thinking of things to do. “I want to show you something!” he says, hopping excitedly from one foot to the other. “Get up! Get up!” A field trip? Why not? Almost anything beats spending the day in a semi-trance state on a mattress covered with stains.
Continue

Dodging Bullets with Syrian Rebels Who Love Soccer and Adolf Hitler

As he does every morning, Amir wakes me by asking if I would like to die with him. “I can take you to Damascus, but we won’t survive. We’ll go to Allah together, you and me, as martyrs,” he says, grinning as though we both had nothing better to do today, or any other day, than buy the farm.

“Forget it, Amir,” I say. “I’m not in a dying mood.” It was a long night of soccer—Dortmund vs. Malaga. I shake my head and try to shake the pins and needles from my limbs. “Not today!”

Sooner or later, I want to see Damascus. But I want to see it alive. Amir is 22 and hates waiting. He is always thinking of things to do. “I want to show you something!” he says, hopping excitedly from one foot to the other. “Get up! Get up!” A field trip? Why not? Almost anything beats spending the day in a semi-trance state on a mattress covered with stains.

Continue

More Chaos in Rio de Janeiro: Rubber Bullets Fly Outside the Confederations Cup Final
On Sunday, Brazil’s national men’s soccer team dismantled defending World Cup champions Spain 3–0 in the final of the Confederations Cup in Rio de Janeiro. In a soccer-crazed country like Brazil, you’d expect the buildup to such an event would be massive. And it was—but not for the love of the game. Thousands took to the streets adjacent to the soccer stadium where the match was played to continue to voice popular disdain for what protesters believe are the misplaced priorities of the national government: choosing to fund massive international sporting events like the World Cup and the Olympics instead of investing in health care and human development.
Starting at noon on Sunday, the neighborhood of Tijuca was a fortified by around 6,000 police officers, members of the Federal Highway Police, National Force, Army, and Home Guard. A so-called FIFA perimeter was established, surrounding a two-mile radius around the stadium, only those who had tickets could pass, and locals could only enter after presenting proof of residence. The numbers were less significant than in the previous week’s demonstrations, and little more than 5,000 people were in the area until game time.
Continue + More Photos

More Chaos in Rio de Janeiro: Rubber Bullets Fly Outside the Confederations Cup Final

On Sunday, Brazil’s national men’s soccer team dismantled defending World Cup champions Spain 3–0 in the final of the Confederations Cup in Rio de Janeiro. In a soccer-crazed country like Brazil, you’d expect the buildup to such an event would be massive. And it was—but not for the love of the game. Thousands took to the streets adjacent to the soccer stadium where the match was played to continue to voice popular disdain for what protesters believe are the misplaced priorities of the national government: choosing to fund massive international sporting events like the World Cup and the Olympics instead of investing in health care and human development.

Starting at noon on Sunday, the neighborhood of Tijuca was a fortified by around 6,000 police officers, members of the Federal Highway Police, National Force, Army, and Home Guard. A so-called FIFA perimeter was established, surrounding a two-mile radius around the stadium, only those who had tickets could pass, and locals could only enter after presenting proof of residence. The numbers were less significant than in the previous week’s demonstrations, and little more than 5,000 people were in the area until game time.

Continue + More Photos

Happy 10th birthday to the Chinatown Soccer Club! Watch the documentary we made about them earlier this year.

Happy 10th birthday to the Chinatown Soccer Club! Watch the documentary we made about them earlier this year.


WHO NEEDS FIFA? - 
INTERNATIONAL SOCCER OUTCASTS FACE OFF IN KURDISTAN
By Miguel Pazcabrales


Photos By Safin Hamid/Metrography
Kurdish fans came out in full force to support the home team.
This summer most of the developed world excitedly watched Euro 2012 and qualifying matches for the World Cup in the comfort of air conditioning, guzzling pints and releasing beer farts into couch cushions. But in Darfur, Sri Lanka, Zanzibar, Western Sahara, Northern Cyprus, the Provence region of France, and a handful of other places, all eyes were on Erbil, the capital of Iraqi Kurdistan, where the fifth VIVA World Cup was held in June.
The event is a biennial soccer tournament organized by the Non-FIFA board (better known as the NF Board) and the top competition for teams not recognized by the international soccer establishment. Twenty-seven of the NF Board’s members hail from autonomous countries, but the majority represent stateless nations.
The VIVA Cup, like many international tournaments, is ostensibly about unity, peace, and goodwill, but the athletes are also enormously proud to represent their micronations and regions. And while everyone can agree that good feelings are nice, winning is much better. Impressively, Darfur’s team of refugees qualified to compete in the tournament (and though they lost their first two games by a combined score of 33–0, they did score a goal against Western Sahara). In the final, Kurdistan beat Northern Cyprus 2–1.
A month after the games concluded, I spoke with  Muhammed Askari, a die-hard Kurdish fan, and Mark Hodson, the head coach of Darfur United, to see how they felt about the games, soccer, and national pride.
A player for Kurdistan shoots against Darfur United.
Muhammed Askari is a 26-year-old journalist from south Kurdistan.VICE: Were you excited when Kurdistan was named cup host?Muhammed Askari: Of course! I think every Kurd was psyched to host the cup and to welcome the visiting nations. There were nine teams this year, more than ever before. Most were from Europe, but since word went out that we’d be hosting, we knew we had to win, especially since we lost to Padania in 2010.What was the atmosphere like at the games?All the Kurds went wild. To hear our own team sing our anthem, wear our uniform with the flag on it and everything… it’s every Kurd’s dream. I personally don’t identify myself as an Iraqi and I think a lot of Kurds abroad—we’re in four countries in the Middle East—feel the same thing. It’s kind of a bummer.Do you think this is the beginning of a more internationally recognized Kurdistan?It’s the beginning of something big for Kurdistan and for the soccer team. Myself, I’d like to think FIFA will take this as a chance to welcome Kurdistan into international play, in the same way Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland have been.That seems totally reasonable.Yeah, Kurdistan is different from Iraq. It’s trees, rocks, nature; Iraq’s all desert. We’re happy to have hosted the tournament—we love visitors and tourists. Kurdistan has been a self-sufficient region for a couple decades now; we’ve got our own government and security forces. Unlike our Muslim neighbors, we don’t have a specific religion. We’re very open.The way politics work out on the field is kind of odd—some players on the Kurdish team also play for Iraq, right?Well, Halgurd Mulla Mohammed, who I think was the best player in the tournament, also played for the Iraqi national team. It’s the same with Khalid Mushir. But I feel like they’re more psyched to represent Kurdistan than Iraq, and the same goes for the rest of the team. They played with passion, since they knew they wouldn’t have another chance to represent their country at home. They made the home fans happy.
CONTINUE

WHO NEEDS FIFA? - 

INTERNATIONAL SOCCER OUTCASTS FACE OFF IN KURDISTAN

By Miguel Pazcabrales

Photos By Safin Hamid/Metrography


Kurdish fans came out in full force to support the home team.

This summer most of the developed world excitedly watched Euro 2012 and qualifying matches for the World Cup in the comfort of air conditioning, guzzling pints and releasing beer farts into couch cushions. But in Darfur, Sri Lanka, Zanzibar, Western Sahara, Northern Cyprus, the Provence region of France, and a handful of other places, all eyes were on Erbil, the capital of Iraqi Kurdistan, where the fifth VIVA World Cup was held in June.

The event is a biennial soccer tournament organized by the Non-FIFA board (better known as the NF Board) and the top competition for teams not recognized by the international soccer establishment. Twenty-seven of the NF Board’s members hail from autonomous countries, but the majority represent stateless nations.

The VIVA Cup, like many international tournaments, is ostensibly about unity, peace, and goodwill, but the athletes are also enormously proud to represent their micronations and regions. And while everyone can agree that good feelings are nice, winning is much better. Impressively, Darfur’s team of refugees qualified to compete in the tournament (and though they lost their first two games by a combined score of 33–0, they did score a goal against Western Sahara). In the final, Kurdistan beat Northern Cyprus 2–1.

A month after the games concluded, I spoke with  Muhammed Askari, a die-hard Kurdish fan, and Mark Hodson, the head coach of Darfur United, to see how they felt about the games, soccer, and national pride.


A player for Kurdistan shoots against Darfur United.

Muhammed Askari is a 26-year-old journalist from south Kurdistan.

VICE: Were you excited when Kurdistan was named cup host?
Muhammed Askari: Of course! I think every Kurd was psyched to host the cup and to welcome the visiting nations. There were nine teams this year, more than ever before. Most were from Europe, but since word went out that we’d be hosting, we knew we had to win, especially since we lost to Padania in 2010.

What was the atmosphere like at the games?
All the Kurds went wild. To hear our own team sing our anthem, wear our uniform with the flag on it and everything… it’s every Kurd’s dream. I personally don’t identify myself as an Iraqi and I think a lot of Kurds abroad—we’re in four countries in the Middle East—feel the same thing. It’s kind of a bummer.

Do you think this is the beginning of a more internationally recognized Kurdistan?
It’s the beginning of something big for Kurdistan and for the soccer team. Myself, I’d like to think FIFA will take this as a chance to welcome Kurdistan into international play, in the same way Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland have been.

That seems totally reasonable.
Yeah, Kurdistan is different from Iraq. It’s trees, rocks, nature; Iraq’s all desert. We’re happy to have hosted the tournament—we love visitors and tourists. Kurdistan has been a self-sufficient region for a couple decades now; we’ve got our own government and security forces. Unlike our Muslim neighbors, we don’t have a specific religion. We’re very open.

The way politics work out on the field is kind of odd—some players on the Kurdish team also play for Iraq, right?
Well, Halgurd Mulla Mohammed, who I think was the best player in the tournament, also played for the Iraqi national team. It’s the same with Khalid Mushir. But I feel like they’re more psyched to represent Kurdistan than Iraq, and the same goes for the rest of the team. They played with passion, since they knew they wouldn’t have another chance to represent their country at home. They made the home fans happy.

CONTINUE

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