noiseymusic:


How familiar are you with the straight edge punk movement?Well, I think if you really examine the phrase “Straight Edge Punk,” you’re probably on the phone with the father of that right now. I have no inhibitions and I pretend I’m Little Richard every night, and I’m inspired by the most outrageous, audacious, and defiant musicians who ever walked the earth. Little Richard perfected defiance. He escalated defiance into an art form.
What makes Rock ‘N’ Roll so uniquely American?You can’t come up with this stuff unless you have a Constitution. You need to have a guarantee that you won’t have a king or an emperor coming and taking your productivity away. I don’t know how much history you’ve studied, but that’s the difference between the rest of the world and America. We are based on an experiment in self-government. I gotta tell ya, every meaningful, inspiring, driving piece of music ever has come from a black guy who either dreamed of being free, or celebrated coming free. And that’s where that unleashed ferocity and defiance that created Howlin’ Wolf and Muddy Waters and certainly Chuck Berry and Bo Diddley and Little Richard and Jimi Hendrix and James Brown—all the black guys, they were shackled. And then they did, and when they got their civil rights all hell broke loose. God bless ‘em.
One of the most badass parts of the live record is when you fire off this guitar solo and say, “You can’t get a solo like that in Canada! You can’t get a solo like that in France!”You can’t. Well you can, because a lot of Canadian guys and French guys and English guys picked up on that black influence that I mentioned. All the English bands—the Stones, the Beatles, the Who, the Kinks—played soul music, and then they started copying that spirit with their own compositions. That’s why the music had so much uppityness.
How do you feel about hip-hop, then?Hip-hop, I think, is anti-black. Even James Brown was a bit upset by the rap and the hip-hop as not being a genuine musical force. I think it’s a cool bebop, and I think it’s a cool groove sometimes, but it doesn’t have the effervesce and the uplifting defiance factor. I know the rap guys think they’re being defiant, but it’s almost like sheep music to me. I just don’t appreciate it, I think they glorify the worst aspects of the worst people. I try listening to it, but then I turn it off because I’m waiting for something to happen. Then I go put on James Brown.

—We interviewed Ted Nugent. Read the whole thing here.

noiseymusic:

How familiar are you with the straight edge punk movement?
Well, I think if you really examine the phrase “Straight Edge Punk,” you’re probably on the phone with the father of that right now. I have no inhibitions and I pretend I’m Little Richard every night, and I’m inspired by the most outrageous, audacious, and defiant musicians who ever walked the earth. Little Richard perfected defiance. He escalated defiance into an art form.

What makes Rock ‘N’ Roll so uniquely American?
You can’t come up with this stuff unless you have a Constitution. You need to have a guarantee that you won’t have a king or an emperor coming and taking your productivity away. I don’t know how much history you’ve studied, but that’s the difference between the rest of the world and America. We are based on an experiment in self-government. I gotta tell ya, every meaningful, inspiring, driving piece of music ever has come from a black guy who either dreamed of being free, or celebrated coming free. And that’s where that unleashed ferocity and defiance that created Howlin’ Wolf and Muddy Waters and certainly Chuck Berry and Bo Diddley and Little Richard and Jimi Hendrix and James Brown—all the black guys, they were shackled. And then they did, and when they got their civil rights all hell broke loose. God bless ‘em.

One of the most badass parts of the live record is when you fire off this guitar solo and say, “You can’t get a solo like that in Canada! You can’t get a solo like that in France!”
You can’t. Well you can, because a lot of Canadian guys and French guys and English guys picked up on that black influence that I mentioned. All the English bands—the Stones, the Beatles, the Who, the Kinks—played soul music, and then they started copying that spirit with their own compositions. That’s why the music had so much uppityness.

How do you feel about hip-hop, then?
Hip-hop, I think, is anti-black. Even James Brown was a bit upset by the rap and the hip-hop as not being a genuine musical force. I think it’s a cool bebop, and I think it’s a cool groove sometimes, but it doesn’t have the effervesce and the uplifting defiance factor. I know the rap guys think they’re being defiant, but it’s almost like sheep music to me. I just don’t appreciate it, I think they glorify the worst aspects of the worst people. I try listening to it, but then I turn it off because I’m waiting for something to happen. Then I go put on James Brown.

—We interviewed Ted Nugent. Read the whole thing here.

What Sort of Person Hates Obama? 
Congrats to Obama! But before you start planning your Obamarama dinner party, take a moment to consider the forgotten and distressed. Although in your bubble of liberalism you might think that everyone would be thrilled about America’s gradual progression towards a political system which might actually do something right someday, in fact large swathes of America are furious about it.
It doesn’t seem right, after such a win for democracy and liberalism, to mock those less fortunate than ourselves, so I’ve compiled a selection of tweets that can help us to empathize with Republicans everywhere, as well as to answer the question: What sort of person hates Barack Obama?

Maria likes:- #Bieber2012- Time off school- Louis Vuitton trainers- The snack Reeses Peanut Butter Cups- Special effects make-up- The Bible- Louis from pop band One Direction

Trisha Paytas likes:- YouTube- Her breasts- Being a mix of “Woody Allen and your local hooker”- Catholicism- Candles- Tall Men- Christina Aguilera’s hair- The idea of being entirely supported by an oil tycoon 

Ted Nugent likes:- God- Hunting- Taking pictures of dead things- Venison jerky- Pictures of women holding guns- Slaughtering pigs from helicopters with machine guns
Continue

What Sort of Person Hates Obama? 

Congrats to Obama! But before you start planning your Obamarama dinner party, take a moment to consider the forgotten and distressed. Although in your bubble of liberalism you might think that everyone would be thrilled about America’s gradual progression towards a political system which might actually do something right someday, in fact large swathes of America are furious about it.

It doesn’t seem right, after such a win for democracy and liberalism, to mock those less fortunate than ourselves, so I’ve compiled a selection of tweets that can help us to empathize with Republicans everywhere, as well as to answer the question: What sort of person hates Barack Obama?


Maria likes:
- #Bieber2012
- Time off school
- Louis Vuitton trainers
- The snack Reeses Peanut Butter Cups
- Special effects make-up
- The Bible
- Louis from pop band One Direction

Trisha Paytas likes:
- YouTube
- Her breasts
- Being a mix of “Woody Allen and your local hooker”
- Catholicism
- Candles
- Tall Men
- Christina Aguilera’s hair
- The idea of being entirely supported by an oil tycoon

 

Ted Nugent likes:
- God
- Hunting
- Taking pictures of dead things
- Venison jerky
- Pictures of women holding guns
- Slaughtering pigs from helicopters with machine guns

Continue