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VICE News Capsule – March 20 

The VICE News Capsule is a daily roundup that looks beyond the headlines. Today: Venezuela’s human rights issue, sex trade in Kenya, protests in Taiwan and 16,000 Islamists detained in Egypt.

Facedown Generation
Over the next month, in celebration of the forthcoming release of Tao Lin’s latest novel, Taipei, we will be featuring a weekly selection of photos taken by the author during his recent trip to Taipei, Taiwan. While there, he took thousands of pictures with his iPhone, pictures which he has divided into albums titled things like “Taipei fashion,” “Taipei carbs,” “Taipei babies,” and “Taipei animals,” among others. The images were taken between January and February 2013 during one of his semiannual visits to the Taiwanese capital, where his parents live.
This week’s photos are named after a term* in Taiwan, which Tao’s mom says she first heard on TV, for people who seem unable to stop looking at their phones while in public.
All photos and captions by Tao Lin.
*literal translation from Mandarin is something like “head-lowered [‘group’ or ‘troupe’].”
Taipei will be released on June 4 from Vintage and is available for pre-order now. To read an early excerpt from the novel that we published in 2011 titled “Relationship Story,” click here.

This woman is staring at her Samsung Galaxy thinking, What am I trying to look at? what is my finger wanting to push? The screen is black. 

The teenager with white shoes is trying to convince himself that no one can see what he’s looking at and that, even if they could, he shouldn’t feel embarrassed, or whatever, because he’s only, at the moment, looking at his Gmail account. The man in the red-striped shirt is trying to cancel his Boingo account for what must be, he thinks, the 20th time, or something insane like that, in probably not even a full year.

This man is rereading an article titled “CNET Asia’s Top 10 phones.” His LG Optimus G is ranked number seven. He doesn’t know how he feels about this. Being worse than six phones, on a list of ten phones, seems bad, but being listed at all—how many phones are there? hundreds? thousands?—seems good.
Continue

Facedown Generation

Over the next month, in celebration of the forthcoming release of Tao Lin’s latest novel, Taipei, we will be featuring a weekly selection of photos taken by the author during his recent trip to Taipei, Taiwan. While there, he took thousands of pictures with his iPhone, pictures which he has divided into albums titled things like “Taipei fashion,” “Taipei carbs,” “Taipei babies,” and “Taipei animals,” among others. The images were taken between January and February 2013 during one of his semiannual visits to the Taiwanese capital, where his parents live.

This week’s photos are named after a term* in Taiwan, which Tao’s mom says she first heard on TV, for people who seem unable to stop looking at their phones while in public.

All photos and captions by Tao Lin.

*literal translation from Mandarin is something like “head-lowered [‘group’ or ‘troupe’].”

Taipei will be released on June 4 from Vintage and is available for pre-order now. To read an early excerpt from the novel that we published in 2011 titled “Relationship Story,” click here.

This woman is staring at her Samsung Galaxy thinking, What am I trying to look at? what is my finger wanting to push? The screen is black. 

The teenager with white shoes is trying to convince himself that no one can see what he’s looking at and that, even if they could, he shouldn’t feel embarrassed, or whatever, because he’s only, at the moment, looking at his Gmail account. The man in the red-striped shirt is trying to cancel his Boingo account for what must be, he thinks, the 20th time, or something insane like that, in probably not even a full year.

This man is rereading an article titled “CNET Asia’s Top 10 phones.” His LG Optimus G is ranked number seven. He doesn’t know how he feels about this. Being worse than six phones, on a list of ten phones, seems bad, but being listed at all—how many phones are there? hundreds? thousands?—seems good.

Continue

Taipei Carbs – by Tao Lin
above: Tao’s dad eating an “oil stick” (literal translation from Mandarin) 
Over the next month, in celebration of the forthcoming release of Tao Lin’s latest novel, Taipei, we will be featuring a weekly selection of photos taken by the author during his recent trip to Taipei, Taiwan. While there, he took thousands of pictures with his iPhone, pictures which he has divided into albums titled things like “Taipei fashion,” “Taipei food,” “Taipei babies,” and “Taipei animals,” among others. The images were taken between January and February 2013 during one of his semiannual visits to the Taiwanese capital, where his parents live. This selection is titled “Taipei Carbs.” All photos and captions by Tao Lin.Taipei will be released on June 4 from Vintage and is available for pre-order now. To read an early excerpt from the novel that we published in 2011 titled “Relationship Story,” click here.
I seem to rush, whenever I see this photo, to think Huffington Post quickly, like I’m answering a question before someone else does
Al Gore should abruptly stumble cross-stage during a TED talk, falling to his knees, when his vision is replaced with this photo, which he’s never seen, for 2.5 seconds
Continue

Taipei Carbs – by Tao Lin

above: Tao’s dad eating an “oil stick” (literal translation from Mandarin) 

Over the next month, in celebration of the forthcoming release of Tao Lin’s latest novel, Taipei, we will be featuring a weekly selection of photos taken by the author during his recent trip to Taipei, Taiwan. While there, he took thousands of pictures with his iPhone, pictures which he has divided into albums titled things like “Taipei fashion,” “Taipei food,” “Taipei babies,” and “Taipei animals,” among others. The images were taken between January and February 2013 during one of his semiannual visits to the Taiwanese capital, where his parents live. This selection is titled “Taipei Carbs.” All photos and captions by Tao Lin.

Taipei will be released on June 4 from Vintage and is available for pre-order now. To read an early excerpt from the novel that we published in 2011 titled “Relationship Story,” click here.


I seem to rush, whenever I see this photo, to think Huffington Post quickly, like I’m answering a question before someone else does


Al Gore should abruptly stumble cross-stage during a TED talk, falling to his knees, when his vision is replaced with this photo, which he’s never seen, for 2.5 seconds

Continue

Over the next two months, in celebration of the forthcoming release of Tao Lin’s latest novel, Taipei, we will be featuring a weekly selection of photos taken by the author during his recent trip to Taipei, Taiwan. While there, he took thousands of pictures with his iPhone, pictures which he has divided into albums titled things like “Taipei funny,” “Taipei food,” Taipei babies,” and “Taipei animals,” among others. The images were taken between January and February 2013 during one of his semi-yearly visits to the Taiwanese capital, where his parents live. This first selection is titled “Taipei babies.” All photos and captions by Tao Lin.
Taipei, will be released on June 4 from Vintage and is available for pre-order now. To read an early excerpt from the novel that we published in 2011 titled “Relationship Story,” click here.
confusion baby
bat baby
More babies

Over the next two months, in celebration of the forthcoming release of Tao Lin’s latest novel, Taipei, we will be featuring a weekly selection of photos taken by the author during his recent trip to Taipei, Taiwan. While there, he took thousands of pictures with his iPhone, pictures which he has divided into albums titled things like “Taipei funny,” “Taipei food,” Taipei babies,” and “Taipei animals,” among others. The images were taken between January and February 2013 during one of his semi-yearly visits to the Taiwanese capital, where his parents live. This first selection is titled “Taipei babies.” All photos and captions by Tao Lin.


Taipei, will be released on June 4 from Vintage and is available for pre-order now. To read an early excerpt from the novel that we published in 2011 titled “Relationship Story,” click here.


confusion baby


bat baby

More babies

FRESH OFF THE BOAT: THE LAST TAIPEI EPISODE

FRESH OFF THE BOAT: THE LAST TAIPEI EPISODE

Fresh Off the Boat - Back in Taiwan, Part 2

The last leg of Eddie’s trip to Taiwan features soy milk breakfast feasts in Yung Ho, up-skirt shots at cosplay fashion shows, and underwhelming German sausages served in toilet bowls. Finesse that.
WATCH IT HERE

Fresh Off the Boat - Back in Taiwan, Part 2

The last leg of Eddie’s trip to Taiwan features soy milk breakfast feasts in Yung Ho, up-skirt shots at cosplay fashion shows, and underwhelming German sausages served in toilet bowls. Finesse that.

WATCH IT HERE

Fresh Off the Boat: Back in Taiwan
In this episode of Fresh Off the Boat, Eddie heads back to Taiwan to get heavy into the heavy metal scene—face paint, screaming lessons, and furry pink pillows. Along the way, Eddie makes a quick pit stop to taste Taiwan’s famous “little snacks” in Gongguan before debating the pros and cons of Taiwanese independence over a home-cooked meal with local metal group CHTHONIC.

Fresh Off the Boat: Back in Taiwan

In this episode of Fresh Off the Boat, Eddie heads back to Taiwan to get heavy into the heavy metal scene—face paint, screaming lessons, and furry pink pillows. Along the way, Eddie makes a quick pit stop to taste Taiwan’s famous “little snacks” in Gongguan before debating the pros and cons of Taiwanese independence over a home-cooked meal with local metal group CHTHONIC.


Coming up on the next installments of Fresh Off the Boat’s Taiwan adventure, Eddie goes deep into Taiwan’s unique subcultures. He vibes out in the metal scene, judges a cosplay fashion show, and taste tests stinky tofu, all while learning how Taiwanese identity is defined.
Watch: Fresh Off the Boat - Back in Taiwan (Trailer)

Coming up on the next installments of Fresh Off the Boat’s Taiwan adventure, Eddie goes deep into Taiwan’s unique subcultures. He vibes out in the metal scene, judges a cosplay fashion show, and taste tests stinky tofu, all while learning how Taiwanese identity is defined.

Watch: Fresh Off the Boat - Back in Taiwan (Trailer)


The family edition of Fresh Off the Boat brings you father-son hang time with Eddie and his dad in Taipei. The Huang men catch up over the most meticulously crafted dumplings in the world and pay a visit to Eddie’s grandpa’s resting place in Yang Ming Shan.

Watch Fresh Off the Boat - Taiwan, Part 3

The family edition of Fresh Off the Boat brings you father-son hang time with Eddie and his dad in Taipei. The Huang men catch up over the most meticulously crafted dumplings in the world and pay a visit to Eddie’s grandpa’s resting place in Yang Ming Shan.

Watch Fresh Off the Boat - Taiwan, Part 3

Fresh Off the Boat - Taiwan, Part 1

Taiwan has a complex cultural blend embedded in its history that has given it a character unlike any other place in the world.

In the first of three Fresh Off the Boat: Taiwan episodes, Eddie gets hopped up on betel nut, gives a survey at his favorite delicacies at Shilin night market, and goes late-night shrimping. 

We found ourselves in some interesting scenarios, and they all highlight the endearing sense of humor that pulsates through Taiwanese culture. If there’s one thing we came away with, it was that Taiwan knows how to have fun.

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