VICE Meets Tom Green
Not everyone has the balls or reckless commitment to absurdity to suckle milk out of cow udders and put it on TV. For Tom Green, it was one of the most unforgettable moments of his unexpected rise to the top. In fact, few comedians have had a crazier pre-YouTube ascension to fame than the 42-year-old native of Pembroke, Ontario.
In the early 90s, he cut his teeth in the entertainment world as MC Face of the award-winning Canadian rap group Organized Rhyme. By the mid 90s, he had transitioned into radio and television, bringing his deliriously weird and offbeat brand of comedy to community-access television in Ottawa.
The show was deliberately lo-fi and antagonistic. Some of the more memorable stunts Tom pulled include painting a comically vulgar image on his parents’ car and dubbing it the “Slutmobile,” attempting to interview anxious, uneasy pedestrians with slabs of beef stuck to his head, and, yes, vigorously humping a dead moose. At the turn of the century, Tom was one of MTV’s most original and biggest stars, and his impact has left a noticeable legacy—you can see his comic imprint on avant-garde, genre-busting shows like Jackass and the Eric Andre Show.

We sat down with Tom over beers for a long discussion of his wild career trajectory, the finer points of suckling milk out of cow udders, and the time Eminem shouted him out in a massive pop song.
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VICE Meets Tom Green

Not everyone has the balls or reckless commitment to absurdity to suckle milk out of cow udders and put it on TV. For Tom Green, it was one of the most unforgettable moments of his unexpected rise to the top. In fact, few comedians have had a crazier pre-YouTube ascension to fame than the 42-year-old native of Pembroke, Ontario.

In the early 90s, he cut his teeth in the entertainment world as MC Face of the award-winning Canadian rap group Organized Rhyme. By the mid 90s, he had transitioned into radio and television, bringing his deliriously weird and offbeat brand of comedy to community-access television in Ottawa.

The show was deliberately lo-fi and antagonistic. Some of the more memorable stunts Tom pulled include painting a comically vulgar image on his parents’ car and dubbing it the “Slutmobile,” attempting to interview anxious, uneasy pedestrians with slabs of beef stuck to his head, and, yes, vigorously humping a dead moose. At the turn of the century, Tom was one of MTV’s most original and biggest stars, and his impact has left a noticeable legacy—you can see his comic imprint on avant-garde, genre-busting shows like Jackass and the Eric Andre Show.

We sat down with Tom over beers for a long discussion of his wild career trajectory, the finer points of suckling milk out of cow udders, and the time Eminem shouted him out in a massive pop song.

Watch

We had beers with Tom Green and talked about the finer points of suckling milk out of cow udders, the time Eminem shouted him out on a massive pop song, and how a kid with a community-access show in Ontario became one of the biggest cable-TV stars of the new millennium.

We had beers with Tom Green and talked about the finer points of suckling milk out of cow udders, the time Eminem shouted him out on a massive pop song, and how a kid with a community-access show in Ontario became one of the biggest cable-TV stars of the new millennium.

YouTube sensation Shoenice22 has spent the last two years eating and drinking everything from sticks of deodorant, to tampons, to full bottles of grain alcohol. He’s a grown up and more self-destructive version of that weird kid at camp who would eat worms for attention.
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YouTube sensation Shoenice22 has spent the last two years eating and drinking everything from sticks of deodorant, to tampons, to full bottles of grain alcohol. He’s a grown up and more self-destructive version of that weird kid at camp who would eat worms for attention.

Watch the video

In the sexiest episode of VICE Meets ever, we interview stylist and Editor-in-Chief of Richardson Magazine, Andrew Richardson. We visit his home/studio to get a preview of his latest issue, which features former pornstar Belladonna without hair.

(Source: Vice Magazine)


VICE Meets Brett Ratner, and it turns out he can actually be a pretty nice guy.

VICE Meets Brett Ratner, and it turns out he can actually be a pretty nice guy.

While in LA working on our Showbiz issue, we met up with comedian and VICE columnist Rob Delaney for a chat about hairiness, Twitter, and funny meat words. He’s a wise man who knows a lot about these things, and a few other things, like vaginas and not drinking, so give this video a spin and learn some stuff. 

In this episode of VICE Meets, we meet cult independent filmmaker Abel Ferrara in his neighborhood, Little Italy. He explains the true story behind his original series for VICE, Pizza Connection, together with a former FBI agent who joins us amidst neighborhood commotion.

agnès b. is a French designer, film director, producer, and patron of the performing arts. She is also the main supporter of the scientific vessel Tara, which investigates the impact of global warming. agnès invited us to spend the day with her for the first episode of the new season of VICE Meets

(Source: Vice Magazine)