Young Love Fucks Us All: How I Got Over My Youth of Depression and Bad Relationships
Young love is a business. Adult women are sold it in films like Twilight, The Notebook, andRomeo + Juliet and buy into the fairytale for two hours while putting themselves in the shoes of Kristen Stewart, Rachel McAdams, or Claire Danes, or whoever is falling deeply for the boy promising her everything. The disconnect between what’s happening on screen and what happens to them in real life never appalls them. Men may watch different movies, but their perspective on love and relationships is no better. Though they often feign cynicism and pretend young love barely even exists, that’s merely a stance that allows them to deny they’ve been hurt by their early relationships.
It’s in this period of young love that many of our wounds and insecurities are created—the same wounds and insecurities that keep us from finding a present-day love to make us happy. Perhaps if we found it easier to look back, we’d find it easier to heal those wounds and move on with our lives. We don’t because we’re afraid to—but why? Is it the memory of what some boy or girl did to us? Or is it the memory of having once been so earnest—of having promised the world not just to these boys or girls but to ourselves, before work, money, and real commitments came along to crush us?
Is it young love we’re afraid of, or having once been young? I decided to retrace my first clumsy romantic steps in an attempt to find out.
Continue

Young Love Fucks Us All: How I Got Over My Youth of Depression and Bad Relationships

Young love is a business. Adult women are sold it in films like TwilightThe Notebook, andRomeo + Juliet and buy into the fairytale for two hours while putting themselves in the shoes of Kristen Stewart, Rachel McAdams, or Claire Danes, or whoever is falling deeply for the boy promising her everything. The disconnect between what’s happening on screen and what happens to them in real life never appalls them. Men may watch different movies, but their perspective on love and relationships is no better. Though they often feign cynicism and pretend young love barely even exists, that’s merely a stance that allows them to deny they’ve been hurt by their early relationships.

It’s in this period of young love that many of our wounds and insecurities are created—the same wounds and insecurities that keep us from finding a present-day love to make us happy. Perhaps if we found it easier to look back, we’d find it easier to heal those wounds and move on with our lives. We don’t because we’re afraid to—but why? Is it the memory of what some boy or girl did to us? Or is it the memory of having once been so earnest—of having promised the world not just to these boys or girls but to ourselves, before work, money, and real commitments came along to crush us?

Is it young love we’re afraid of, or having once been young? I decided to retrace my first clumsy romantic steps in an attempt to find out.

Continue

VICE Shorts: Watch “I Love Sarah Jane”, a short film about scary things like zombies and childhood crushes.

VICE Shorts: Watch “I Love Sarah Jane”, a short film about scary things like zombies and childhood crushes.

Desfila - by Kevin Kunishi
Between 2009 and 2010 I lived in the highlands of Northern Nicaragua, exploring the collective memory of those involved in the US-backed Contra war that occurred in the 80s. Every other weekend, I would take a three hour bus ride to the city of Jinotega to access electricity and stock up on supplies. Parades were a constant occurrence in Jinotega. On Sunday morning, like clockwork, firecrackers would rocket outside my window. Drums, trumpets, and tubas echoed in the distance. An elaborate procession filled the cobblestone streets, winding through the city. The stars were invariably children or teenagers, dressed up, adorned, isolated, and assuming the roles they had been designated to play. 
View the full slideshow

Desfila - by Kevin Kunishi

Between 2009 and 2010 I lived in the highlands of Northern Nicaragua, exploring the collective memory of those involved in the US-backed Contra war that occurred in the 80s. Every other weekend, I would take a three hour bus ride to the city of Jinotega to access electricity and stock up on supplies. Parades were a constant occurrence in Jinotega. On Sunday morning, like clockwork, firecrackers would rocket outside my window. Drums, trumpets, and tubas echoed in the distance. An elaborate procession filled the cobblestone streets, winding through the city. The stars were invariably children or teenagers, dressed up, adorned, isolated, and assuming the roles they had been designated to play. 

View the full slideshow